Global stars join RAE

October 14, 2005

The higher education funding councils this week named more than 50 academics from overseas universities and institutes who will, for the first time, bring an international dimension to the strategic deliberations in the research assessment exercise.

The additional 56 members of the main panels, which will co-ordinate the 2008 RAE across similar disciplines, also include a number of non-academic experts from government departments and the world of commerce.

Although international academics have been used in previous exercises, this is the first time they have taken part in the overarching strategic decisions in the RAE.

International and non-academic members will make up about half of all the judges on the main panels, with the rest made up of chairmen of the sub-panels carrying out the assessments for different subject areas.

There is a large contingent of academics from the US among the members - the universities of California, Columbia, Harvard, Princeton and Stanford are all represented on the list, along with experts from Copenhagen, Hong Kong and Maastricht universities. Three members are from the UK Department of Health with single representatives from AstraZeneca, BAE Systems and GlaxoSmithKline.

Ed Hughes, RAE manager at the Higher Education Funding Council for England, said: "We asked all the main panels to think about the additional members they might want to have on their panels. It's not easy to get industry people involved in the process, but there are industry people on sub-panels as well as main panels."

The funding councils said that the members were academics with a high level of knowledge and expertise in research across a broad discipline area internationally, including substantial experience in at least one country outside the UK. They are people whose judgment is likely to command the respect of the higher education community in their subject area.

Mr Hughes added: "Main and sub-panels are meeting soon to finalise their criteria and working methods following the consultation over the summer.

"The appointment now of leading international experts to join the panels will help the main panels as they work towards the publication of final criteria early next year.

"The panellists are looking forward to their contribution to the autumn meetings."

Nominations for additional and international main panel members were invited by the funding bodies in summer 2004.

The funding bodies may make further additional appointments to the main panels as the exercise continues.

Panels will also use international advisers when needed.

The updated full list of panel members will go on the Hefce website this week.

anthea.lipsett@thes.co.uk

 


International and non-academic RAE panel members

Renowned health researcher Jeffrey Koplan is keen to see how the research assessment exercise works.

"I'm interested in how you assess public health and academic performance in general. Although we don't have this kind of exercise, it's of great value to me and my institution to see how it goes on," says the former director of the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"You appreciate how complex a research topic is."

Dr Koplan, who is now vice-president for academic health affairs at Emory University's Woodruff Health Sciences Center, says:"How public health is supported and how research is assessed is important. Much of what we do does not stop at national boundaries."

Dr Koplan was a registrar at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and he has taught at Cambridge University's Judge Business School.

"There is a basis for personal, professional and institutional relationships that makes the RAE especially germane to things I'm interested in," he says.

Main Panel A (MEDICINE)

Russell Hamilton, Department of Health

Sally Macintyre, Medical Research Council

Murray Brennan, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, US

Garret Fitzgerald, University of Pennsylvania, US

Lap-Chee Tsui, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Tachi Yamada, GlaxoSmithKline

Main Panel B (PUBLIC HEALTH)

Noreen Caine, Department of Health

Fritz Henn, Central Institute for Mental Health, Germany

David Henry, University of Newcastle, Australia

Jeffrey Koplan, Woodruff Health Sciences Center, Emory University,US

MAIN PANEL C (ALLIED HEALTH)

Kay East, Department of Health

Alison Spaull, Scottish Executive Health Department

Mi Ja Kim, University of Illinois Chicago, US

John Stamm, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, US

John Stageman, AstraZeneca

Main Panel D (BIOSCIENCES)

Michel Lazdunski, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, France

Paul Struik, Wageningen University, Netherlands

George Coupland, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Germany

Main Panel E (PHYSICAL SCIENCES)

Robert Birgeneau, University of California, Berkeley, US

Manfred Reetz, Max Planck Institute for Coal Research, Germany

Carl Wunsch, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, US

Main Panel F (MATHEMATICS)

Ian Ritchie, Consultant

Niels Keiding, Copenhagen University, Denmark

Peter Sarnak, Princeton University, US

David Waltz, Columbia University, US

Margaret Wright, New York University, US

Main Panel G (ENGINEERING)

William Schowalter, Princeton University, US

Chris Clarkson, BAE Systems

Main Panel H (ARCHITECTURE)

Trevor Barnes, University of British Columbia, Canada

Peter Bogucki, Princeton University, US

Vanessa Lawrence, Ordnance Survey

Main Panel I (ECONOMICS)

Giuseppe Bertola, University of Turin, Italy

Katriina Bystrom, Swedish School of Library and Information Science, Sweden

James Campbell Quick, University of Texas at Arlington, US

Lawrence Gordon, University of Maryland, US

Andrew Likierman, London Business School

Main Panel J (SOCIAL POLICY)

Peter Cane, Australian National University, Australia

Pippa Norris, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard, US

Sharon Witherspoon, Nuffield Foundation

Main Panel K (PSYCHOLOGY)

Max Coltheart, Macquarie University, Australia

Fazal Rizvi, University of Illinois, US

Wim Saris, Maastricht University, Netherlands

MAIN PANEL L (AREA STUDIES)

Shelley Fishkin, Stanford University, US

Wang Gungwu, East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore

Alberta Sbragia, University of Pittsburgh, US

Remke Kruk,Leiden University, Netherlands

Main Panel M (LANGUAGES)

Michael Holquist, Yale University, US

Elizabeth Traugott, Stanford University, US

Elaine Showalter, retired

MAIN PANEL N (CLASSICS)

Sarah Tyacke, National Archives

Frank Turner, Yale University, US

Main Panel O (ART)

Els de Bens, Ghent University, Belgium

Janelle Reinelt, University of California, Irvine, US

Peter Walls, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Richard Buchanan, Carnegie Mellon University, US

Panel titles are indicative, not comprehensive.




RAE timetable

  • October/November 2005: Final round of panel meetings
  • January 2006: Final criteria issued
  • October 31, 2007: All staff to be submitted must be in post
  • November 30, 2007: Closing date for submissions
  • December 31, 2007: Cut-off point for publication of research to be counted
  • December 2008: RAE results published

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