Asia Universities Summit 2017: final programme revealed

The event in South Korea will include the official launch of the THE Asia University Rankings 

February 15, 2017
Ulsan
Source: iStock

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More than 30 university vice-chancellors and industry chief executives from across 14 countries are among a prestigious line-up of speakers confirmed for the Times Higher Education Asia Universities Summit in March.

The event, which takes place at the University of Ulsan from 14 to 16 March 2017, will include a tour of Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) and hear from HHI chairman Kil-seon Choi.

He will be speaking as part of a panel discussion on managing university-industry research collaboration with Feridun Hamdullahpur, president and vice-chancellor of the University of Waterloo; Yuko Harayama, executive member of the Council for Science and Technology in the policy cabinet office of Japan; Young Moo Lee, president of Hanyang University; and Markus Wächter, managing director of TUM Asia.

The summit, which is on the theme “Fording the future – building stronger alliances between university and industry”, will also include keynote speeches from Doh-Yeon Kim, president of Pohang University of Science and Technology, Young-Sup Joo, minister of small and medium business administration in South Korea, and Elsevier chairman YS Chi.

Professor Kim will speak about driving innovative cooperation in university-industry partnerships, while Mr Joo will explore the government’s role in facilitating research and industry-based education and Mr Chi will discuss how industry benefits from university research.

Meanwhile, Michael Shearer, group senior adviser for Asia Pacific at McLaren Technology Group, will talk about building industry links to enhance innovative research.

Brian Baillie, student business and incubation manager at the University of Leeds, will lead a panel discussion on fostering entrepreneurial inventors and innovators with Lily Chan, chief executive officer of NUS Enterprise at the National University of Singapore; Christophe Germain, dean of Shenzhen Audencia Business School; Jaesung Lee, vice-president of Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST); and Professor Hamdullahpur.

Summit delegates will also be given exclusive access to the results of the Asia University Rankings 2017.

Other confirmed vice-chancellors and deputy leaders speaking at the event include chiefs of the University of Sydney, Sungkyunkwan University, Soochow University, Southern University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Queensland University of Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Bandung Institute of Technology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Shiv Nadar University, King Abdulaziz University, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, and Koç University.

Confirmed government and industry figures include Kwan-sup Lee, chief executive officer of Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and Byung Kwon Kim, special investment adviser for the city of Ulsan.

Gi-Hyeon Kim, the mayor of the Metropolitan City of Ulsan, will open the summit on the evening of 14 March.

ellie.bothwell@tesglobal.com

 

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