Appointments

November 1, 2012

King's College London

Evelyn Welch

An award-winning historian has been appointed vice-principal (arts and sciences) at King's College London. Evelyn Welch joins the college from Queen Mary, University of London, where she has been vice-principal for research and international affairs since 2010. She joined Queen Mary as professor of Renaissance studies in 2004 and became dean of the Faculty of Arts in 2006, focusing on student and staff experience. In 2005, her book Shopping in the Renaissance: Consumer Cultures in Italy 1350-1600 was awarded the Wolfson History Prize, a literary award for popular history titles. That book was dedicated to her children - one of whom is Florence Welch, the singer with rock band Florence and the Machine. The art historian will also be professor of Renaissance studies at King's, allowing her to continue her research interests in medicine and perfume in 16th- and 17th-century Italy. Professor Welch said that she was keen to work with staff at King's to "deliver an outstanding student experience and first-rate research that contributes to society's global needs". An undergraduate at Harvard University, Professor Welch gained her PhD at the Warburg Institute, University of London, in 1987. She was later pro vice-chancellor for teaching and learning at the University of Sussex, where she led reform of its science curriculum.

Plymouth University

Maureen Powers

An academic who has dedicated her career to transforming the student experience is swapping the warm climes of Stanford University for the windswept landscape of the Devon coast to take over as the dean of students at Plymouth University. Maureen H. Powers, former dean of students at Stanford and previously vice-president for student affairs at the City College of New York, will oversee "the end-to-end student experience" and work closely with the students' union. "The responsibility to shepherd, through true partnership, a robust relationship between students and the university, where the voice of the student body is both listened to and influential, is an exciting prospect - it takes an enterprising academic community to embrace such a forward-thinking approach," she said. Dr Powers described Plymouth as a "world-class university with an excellent international reputation, which is both impressive in its scope and progressive in its nature". She added: "I am very much looking forward to being a part of such an inspiring and energising place." Born in Massachusetts, Dr Powers earned her bachelor's degree in government at Georgetown University, her master's in urban affairs at St Louis University, Missouri, and her PhD in higher education policy at Indiana University.

University of Reading Malaysia

Tony Downes

The deputy vice-chancellor of the University of Reading has been appointed to a challenging new role as provost and chief executive officer of the institution's campus in Malaysia. An academic expert in commercial law, Tony Downes worked at Durham University and as a visiting professor at the University of Iowa before joining Reading as a reader in European Community law in 1990. He has been deputy vice-chancellor since 2000, although for two periods he served as acting vice-chancellor. Professor Downes said he also has experience of mentoring new vice-chancellors. "They have an enormously important public-facing role, so it is often up to the deputy to keep the show on the road," he said. "Getting a new operation up and running should be a similar task." He added: "We looked at options in India and China before deciding the first venture should be in Malaysia, although I like to think it won't be the last." Construction work on the campus, which is being established in partnership with Education@Iskandar Sendirian Berhad (EISB), a subsidiary of the commercial arm of the Malaysian government, will start next year, with the first cohort of students arriving in 2015. Although a chief operating officer and a construction manager are already in post, Professor Downes expects to visit Malaysia three or four times in the current academic year.

Anglia Ruskin University

Gary Packham

Gary Packham has been appointed deputy dean (research and development) of the Lord Ashcroft International Business School at Anglia Ruskin University. Before joining Anglia Ruskin, Professor Packham was head of the Glamorgan Business School at the University of Glamorgan as well as director of the university's Centre for Enterprise. His professional career took him to organisations including the European Commission, the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office and the Welsh government. "I wanted to be a part of Anglia Ruskin's ambitious plans for developing and investing in research, and for furthering its reputation in this area," he said. "I am looking forward to working closely with our business community and ensuring that we are delivering research, enterprise and innovation that can contribute directly to both our economy and society." Professor Packham began his career in the financial services sector before returning to higher education. He holds visiting professorships at the Moscow International Higher Business School and the University of Glamorgan. His current research includes the emergence of entrepreneurial universities and the contribution of women to the economy through self-employment. His doctorate, which examined management practices in fast-growing firms, was completed in 2001.

Other changes

Mark Cleary, the vice-chancellor of the University of Bradford, is to leave the institution next summer after more than five years in post. Professor Cleary joined Bradford in 2007 from Plymouth University, where he was acting vice-chancellor. The search for a successor will be launched shortly by Paul Jagger, the chair of Bradford's council.

Tony Pedder has been appointed the next chair of the University of Sheffield's governing council. Mr Pedder - a senior figure in the international steel industry - has served as a member of the council since 2005. He will take over from Kathryn Riddle, who will complete her second term of office in July 2013. Mr Pedder has worked since 1972 with Corus and British Steel, serving as chief executive of Corus from 2001 to 2003.

Carole-Anne Upton has been appointed dean of the new School of Media and Performing Arts, and as professor of theatre, at Middlesex University. Professor Upton joins from the University of Ulster, where she was professor of drama in the School of Creative Arts.

A former naval officer who is a specialist in international security and maritime affairs has been appointed the inaugural professor of public international law at the University of Greenwich. Steven Haines, who was a member of the central policy staff in the Ministry of Defence, has academic interests in international law relating to oceans and maritime affairs, as well as the use of force and the conduct of military and security operations.

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