Jo Johnson urged to guarantee Horizon 2020 funding post-Brexit

Guild of European Research Intensive Universities also calls for minister to guarantee Erasmus funding for UK students 

August 9, 2016
Science research
Source: iStock

The Guild of European Research Intensive Universities has called on Jo Johnson to guarantee Horizon 2020 funding for all UK scientists, even after the UK leaves the European Union (EU).

The organisation also urged the universities and science minister to guarantee Erasmus or Erasmus-equivalent funding for UK students beginning their degree programmes while the UK is still a member of the EU, and to guarantee “home fee levels” for all EU students.

In a statement released on 8 August, the guild said it is “equally important” that all EU member states guarantee existing fee levels for all UK students beginning their study while the UK is still a member of the EU.

“Over the past few weeks, evidence has been mounting that the UK’s referendum result on Brexit has begun to undermine collaborative research through a decline in joint funding applications involving UK partners,” it said.

“Meanwhile, uncertainty around future fee arrangements for EU students and student exchange arrangements are detrimental to student mobility to the UK.”

The guild, founded in June, has ten members: Aarhus Universitythe University of Bologna, the University of Glasgow, the University of Göttingen, the University of Groningen, theUniversity of Oslo, the University of Tübingen, the University of WarwickUppsala University and Jagiellonian University in Krakow.

The guild also called on governments in the EU as well as the UK to “prioritise the free flow of students, academic staff and scholarly interaction as a key objective of Brexit negotiations”. It said that the EU has succeeded in creating “highly effective cross-border funding mechanisms for collaborative research, innovation and mobility” and compromising these as a result of Brexit would cause “irreparable damage to the knowledge societies of Europe”.

“The close collaboration of Europe’s world-leading universities is indispensable for delivering groundbreaking research, the ability to translate this into innovate products where appropriate, and educating tomorrow’s innovators and leaders,” it said.

The guild said that its members will increase student mobility and the alliance will create a series of collaborative research workshops for the coming academic year and help to grow the number of collaborative funding bids over the next three years, involving the best researchers among its members.

“Now is a time for European universities to lead by example,” it added. “We call on universities, student societies, and learned societies – within the UK and beyond – to join us in enhancing the mobility of students across Europe, and increasing research collaboration wherever possible, in the face of current political uncertainties. And we call on governments, as well as the Commission, to support us in this endeavour.”

ellie.bothwell@tesglobal.com

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Pro Vice Chancellor Arts and Humanities UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA
Chief Operating Officer UNIVERSITY OF READING
Admissions Officer UK COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND COMPUTING
Deputy Director of Quality and Standards CANTERBURY CHRIST CHURCH UNIVERSITY

Most Commented

Social media icons

Gabriel Egan laments the narcissistic craving for others’ approval brought on, he says, by the use of social networking websites

James Fryer illustration (8 September 2016)

Some lecturers will rightly encourage forms of student interaction that are impossible for those covering their faces, Eric Heinze argues

Elly Walton illustration (25 August 2016)

Treating students as consumers has precipitated a rush to the bottom to give them exactly what they want, says John Warren

Handwritten essay on table

Universities must pay more attention to the difficulties faced by students, says Daniel Dennehy

Theresa May entering 10 Downing Street, London

The prospect of new grammar schools on the horizon raises big questions for HE, writes Nick Hillman