Grant winners

February 4, 2010

WELLCOME TRUST - FELLOWSHIPS

Award winner: Frances Willenbrock

Institution: Cancer Research UK

Value: £304,648

Defining the signalling that leads to activation of lymphocyte integrins

Award winner: David Karlin

Institution: University of Oxford

Value: £224,299

Discovering the function, structure and evolutionary impact of proteins created de novo (ie, not by duplication), in particular in viruses and in bacteria

Award winner: Tihana Bicanic

Institution: St George's, University of London

Value: £446,692

The impact of C. neoformans phenotype and genotype on the clinical course and outcome of human cryptococcal meningitis

Award winner: Mark A.F. Dawson

Institution: University of Cambridge

Value: £803,690

Chromatin regulation of self-renewal transcriptional programmes in leukaemia stem cells

Award winner: Rachel Lennon

Institution: University of Manchester

Value: £6,7

Are interactions between glomerular podocytes and extracellular matrix compromised in proteinuric kidney disease?

Award winner: Bruna Galobardes

Institution: University of Bristol

Value: £329,264

Life course inequalities in asthma: estimating its burden and understanding its aetiology

Award winner: Wendy Anne Burgers

Institution: University of Cape Town

Value: £599,451

Immune activation in HIV infection: investigating mediators and mechanisms

Award winner: Faith H.A. Osier

Institution: Kenya Medical Research Institute (Kemri)

Value: £783,232

Comprehensive analysis of the antibody targets of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites and identification of antigens important in the development of naturally acquired immunity to malaria

Award winner: Mark J.W. McPhail

Institution: Imperial College London

Value: £140,800

Identification of novel biomarkers by in vitro proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in acute and acute-on-chronic liver failure

Award winner: Kerri J. Kinghorn

Institution: University College London

Value: £192,9

Dissecting alpha-synuclein pathology in Drosophila models of Parkinson's disease: aids to understanding idiopathic Parkinson's disease

Award winner: Geoffrey L. Smith

Institution: Imperial College London

Value: £3,485,047

Poxvirus immune evasion strategies

Award winner: Kevin Murphy

Institution: Cardiff University

Value: £775,035

Quantifying vascular influences on neurovascular coupling with fMRI

Award winner: Mark Walton

Institution: University of Oxford

Value: £959,292

Cortical and mesolimbic dopamine interactions during cost-benefit value calculation

Award winner: Chris Wallace

Institution: University of Cambridge

Value: £630,949

Genes and pathways in Type 1 diabetes

Award winner: Eric Ross Griffis

Institution: University of Dundee

Value: £689,547

Regulation of myosin II filament assembly and stabilisation, localisation and cortical anchoring

IN DETAIL

ARTS AND HUMANITIES RESEARCH COUNCIL

Award winner: Michael Hatt

Institution: University of Warwick

Value: £410,000

Sculpture was a prominent feature of the Victorian era, and this three-year project will focus on the art in an attempt to provide a new perspective on artistic culture from the period.

In collaboration with Jason Edwards of the University of York and colleagues from the Yale Centre for British Art, researchers will work with regional museums in Britain to analyse their collections of Victorian sculpture and develop ways to make them more accessible to the public.

In addition, two PhD students will investigate the collection amassed by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, significant patrons of the period, and study the place of sculpture in the 19th century's international exhibitions.

Dr Edwards said: "In this period, the British Empire stretched around the globe, sculpture was being produced on a large scale and millions of people were viewing it, but the majority of the artists concerned have since faded into relative obscurity.

"We will be looking at the prevalence of sculpture in the Victorian era - from statues in parks and squares to decorative features on jewellery and cutlery - as we seek to understand its place in Britain's national and imperial history."

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