Grant winners – 7 January 2016

A round-up of recent recipients of research council cash

January 7, 2016
Grant winners tab on folder

Economic and Social Research Council

Computational catalysis: a sustainable UK-South Africa partnership in high-performance computing


Capacity building and PhD student partnership in the marine and maritime sectors


EpiStressNet: A biosocial systems approach to understanding the epigenetic embedding of social stress responses


Royal Society/British Academy/Academy of Medical Sciences

Newton International Fellowships

Fellowships offer a chance for overseas postdoctoral researchers to carry out world-class research in the UK across all disciplines in the humanities, engineering, and natural and social sciences

Genetic validation of the function of PfEMP1 in Plasmodium falciparum rosette formation


Identification of efficacy predictors for clopidogrel using integrated systems pharmacology approach


Ab initio nucleon scattering off medium mass isotopes


  • Award winner: Natalia Fili (Greece)
  • Institution: University of Kent (host)
  • Value: £99,000

The interaction of fission yeast class I myosin with the plasma membrane and its role on endocytosis


Arts and Humanities Research Council

Research grants

From natural resources to packaging, an interdisciplinary study of skincare products over time


Sustaining ethno-cultural significance of products through urban ecologies of creative practice


In detail

Award winner: Karina Croucher (PI)
Institution: University of Bradford
Value: £195,832

Continuing bonds: exploring the meaning and legacy of death through past and contemporary practice

This project will examine a dialogue about death and dying between the clinical and historical disciplines, aiming to demonstrate how archaeology can inform our attitudes to death and dying, and thereby help to shape policy and practice. It also aims to investigate the value of collaboration between healthcare professionals and archaeologists. Death is still taboo in everyday life, often for fear of the emotions it raises. This has considerable consequences for individuals and families in decision-making in illness and the frailty of old age. The team hopes that, through introducing the topic of death through archaeological examples, “death” can become a more familiar conversation. By bringing it into our everyday conversations, they seek to alleviate many fears and hope that practicalities and preferences can be discussed.

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