Grant winners - 31 July 2014

July 31, 2014

Medical Research Council

Research Grants

How does the trypanosome haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor interact with nutrients and immunity molecules? Receptor structure to cellular mechanism

  • Award winner: Simon Arthur
  • Institution: University of Dundee
  • Value: £344,437

Role of Mef2D in inflammation

  • Award winner: Jo Spencer
  • Institution: King’s College London
  • Value: £377,601

Checkpoint governing B cell fate decisions in human gut-associated lymphoid tissue

MICA: integrated interfacial sensors for assessments of lower limb prosthetics

 

National Institute for Health Research

Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation programme

  • Award winner: Andrew Wilson
  • Institution: University of East Anglia
  • Value: £1,372,865

The efficacy and mechanism evaluation of treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with addition of co-trimoxazole (EME-TIPAC)

Health Technology Assessment programme

Update of the literature review for the Health Technology Assessment programme of methods and their use in assessing the impact from health research programmes

  • Award winner: Sarah Earle
  • Institution: The Open University
  • Value: £215,295

Pre-conception care for women with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes: what are the facilitators and barriers to uptake?

  • Award winner: Mike Crawford
  • Institution: Imperial College London
  • Value: £450,858

Randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy for children with autism spectrum disorders: UK arm of the TIME-A study

 

Leverhulme Trust

International Network Grants
Humanities

Childhood and nation in world cinema: borders and encounters since 1980

Research Programme Grants

  • Award winner: Darren Robinson
  • Institution: University of Nottingham
  • Value: £1,745,632

Sustaining urban habitats: an interdisciplinary approach

In detail

Daniel McCarthy, University of Surrey

Economic and Social Research Council Future Leaders Grant

Award winner: Daniel McCarthy
Institution: University of Surrey
Value: £1,670

Parenting young offenders: shaping and reshaping social networks following custody

This research project focuses on the impacts that child custody has on the broader family after the offender’s release from prison. Drawing on in-depth interviews with parents and qualitative social network analysis, the study will investigate ways that parental social networks are shaped and reshaped as a result of having a child imprisoned, and will explore the wider social and psychological impacts that prison resettlement has on family members related to the offender.

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