Grant winners – 22 June 2017

A round-up of academics awarded research council funding

June 22, 2017
Grant winners tab on folder

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Research grants

The role of neurotransmitter release in synapse formation


Elucidating the mechanisms and pathways of extracellular vesicle uptake and intercellular stress response


Screening for regulators of human embryonic axis elongation in vitro


HDHL-biomarkers: fatty acid metabolism – interlinking diet with cardiometabolic health (FAME)


Leverhulme Trust

Research project grants

Sciences

Advanced molecular materials based on 3D-printed polymeric ionic liquids


Sub-ice weathering: a missing link in the global silicon cycle?


The cooperative brain: multipartite plasticity for entwined cortical functions


Arts and Humanities Research Council

Research grants

Tying Quipu’s key knots


Manuscript pamphleteering in early Stuart England


Black Lives Matter: usable pasts and international futures


Reflections on the centenary of the First World War: learning and legacies for the future


In detail

Award winner: Sally Bushell
Institution: Lancaster University
Value: £914,000

Creating a chronotopic ground for the mapping of literary texts: innovative data visualisation and spatial interpretation in the digital medium

This project will digitally map and create 3D worlds of literary texts to facilitate full exploration of literary time and place. How to spatialise literary texts is a problem that Sally Bushell, head of the department of English and creative writing at Lancaster, had been pondering. “The difficulty was how to do it in a way that was integrated with the text itself and how to categorise different kinds of fictional world that might not map on to actual places,” she said. “Then I was working on [Mikhail] Bakhtin’s concept of the chronotope and I realised that it offered a model that could work. In short though, I wanted to develop the concept before someone else thought of it. We hope to advance understanding of fictional space and place by uniting the verbal representation of place and space in the fictional world with mapping and exploring it in a digital environment.”

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments