Grant winners - 20 June 2013

June 20, 2013

Leverhulme Trust

Research Project Grants
Sciences

How does yeast Golgi organisation contribute to protein glycosylation?

Exploration of typical and atypical development of flexible face-processing strategies

Humanities

Planning in the early medieval landscape: technology, society and settlement

International Networks
Sciences

A UK-Thai programme of observational and theoretical research into binary stars

Humanities

  • Award winner: Alfred Hiatt
  • Institution: Queen Mary, University of London
  • Value: £44,567

Cartography between Europe and the Islamic world, 1100-1600

 

Arts and Humanities Research Council

Responsive Mode Grants

  • Award winner: David Christopher Baker
  • Institution: Institute of Education, University of London
  • Value: £182,717

Blind and partially sighted musicians’ lives: insights into musical practices, participation and trajectories

The multisensory environment (MSE) in dementia care: the role of design

 

National Institute for Health Research

Health Services and Delivery Research Programme

  • Award winner: Martin Pitt
  • Institution: Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry
  • Value: £132,114

The right cot, at the right time, at the right place: use of Neonatal Survey data and computer simulation technology to improve design and organisation of neonatal care networks

An evidence synthesis of risk identification, assessment and management for young people using tier 4 inpatient child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS)

 

European Union

In detail

Marie Curie Industry-Academia Partnership and Pathways programme

Award winner: Ghulam Nabi
Institution: University of Dundee
Value: €2.3 million

ABLADE: Advanced bladder cancer laser diagnostics and therapy

Bladder cancer is one of the most common forms of the disease and one of the hardest to spot. This Europe-wide project coordinated by the University of Dundee will examine whether advanced laser techniques can be used to detect and treat the disease. “There is a notable difference in the behaviour of cancerous cells and healthy ones when exposed to particular laser wavelengths,” said Dr Nabi, senior clinical lecturer in surgical uro-oncology at Dundee. “In theory, we can first identify cancer cells and then kill them with certain wavelengths without damaging the surrounding healthy tissue. If we can develop this kind of laser diagnosis and treatment, we could have a much more effective and minimally invasive technique.” 

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