Times Higher Education Alma Mater Index

List of CEO alumni favours North American and European rivals

September 5, 2013

In most global university league tables, the UK comes a comfortable second, having more institutions in the elite lists than any country except the US.

But in a new index that ranks universities by how many degrees they have awarded to the chief executives of the world’s biggest companies, UK institutions put in a much weaker showing than many of their traditional rivals.

The Times Higher Education Alma Mater Index: Global Executives 2013 ranks institutions by the number of degrees they have awarded to the top dogs of Fortune Global 500 companies.

In first position, unsurprisingly, is Harvard University, which has collectively awarded 31 degrees to 25 CEOs whose companies have a staggering combined revenue of $1.5 trillion (£1 trillion).

In second place is the University of Tokyo, followed by Stanford University. The next three positions are occupied by French institutions: École Polytechnique, HEC Paris and École Nationale d’Administration.

The UK’s top performer is the University of Oxford (21st), which has educated five Fortune Global 500 CEOs. Three other British representatives make the list: the University of Cambridge (45th), City University London (89th) and Cranfield University (92nd).

Asian universities do much better in the table than in conventional rankings, although more than half the list is made up of European or North American institutions.

Forty-seven CEOs, almost 9 per cent of the total, were educated in the rapidly developing “Bric” nations (Brazil, Russia, India and China).

Writing in the index supplement, Justin King, chief executive of Sainsbury’s, says that one of the advantages of doing a business course is that it creates a “close-knit group” than can be “incredibly valuable” during one’s career.

Mr King’s “eclectic” group of peers on his business administration course at the University of Bath – many of whom he is still in contact with – include Bob Wigley, chairman of electronics retailer Expansys; Russell Senior, former guitarist with the band Pulp; and broadcaster Neil Fox, commonly known as Dr Fox.

david.matthews@tsleducation.com

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Most Commented

question marks PhD study

Selecting the right doctorate is crucial for success. Robert MacIntosh and Kevin O'Gorman share top 10 tips on how to pick a PhD

India, UK, flag

Sir Keith Burnett reflects on what he learned about international students while in India with the UK prime minister

Pencil lying on open diary

Requesting a log of daily activity means that trust between the institution and the scholar has broken down, says Toby Miller

Application for graduate job
Universities producing the most employable graduates have been ranked by companies around the world in the Global University Employability Ranking 2016
Retired academics calculating moves while playing bowls

Lincoln Allison, Eric Thomas and Richard Larschan reflect on the ‘next phase’ of the scholarly life