Grant winners - 5 December 2013

December 5, 2013

National Institute for Health Research

Health Services and Delivery
Research programme

Cost-effectiveness of different levels of uptake of bariatric surgery in a large population: cohort study and Markov model

An evaluation of the effectiveness of annual health checks and quality of healthcare for adults with a learning disability

Health Technology Assessment programme

  • Award winner: Zarko Alfirevic
  • Institution: University of Liverpool
  • Value: £233,356

Which method is best for the induction of labour? A systematic review, network meta-analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis

 

Leverhulme Trust

Philip Leverhulme Prizes

These awards recognise early career researchers whose work has already had a significant international impact and whose future research career is exceptionally promising.

Modern languages and literature

  • Award winner: Kathryn Banks
  • Institution: Durham University
  • Value: £70,000

Research on the specificity of literary thinking relative to other forms of thought in the early modern period

Geography

  • Award winner: Dabo Guan
  • Institution: University of Leeds
  • Value: £70,000

To develop a new concept of “disaster footprint” analysis in the field of climate change adaptation

Research Project Grants
Social sciences

  • Award winner: Chris Stiff
  • Institution: Keele University
  • Value: £71,291

Campus citizen behaviours: Predicting students’ prosocial behaviours

  • Award winner: Martin Everett
  • Institution: University of Manchester
  • Value: £247,940

Collecting and analysing secondary covert social network data

Humanities

  • Award winner: David Whitley
  • Institution: University of Cambridge
  • Value: £135,677

In living memory: the place and uses of learning poetry

Sciences

  • Award winner: Louise Martin
  • Institution: University College London
  • Value: £252,262

Prehistoric hunting strategies in Jordan: reconstructing prey behaviour and ecology

In detail

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Award winners: Collin Sones, Rob Eason, Spiros Garbis, Peter Smith and Saul Faust
Institution: University of Southampton
Value: more than £230,000

Laser-printable point-of-care sensors for low-cost medical diagnosis and disease monitoring

This research aims to develop robust, inexpensive, user-friendly, disposable paper-based sensors to detect biomarkers in cancer patients. It will explore whether Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) printing of biological materials can be used to develop the sensor device on paper. These sensors would be telemedicine-enabled, allowing transfer of valuable clinical diagnostic information between patients and their care team via mobile phones. According to Dr Sones: “The paper-based sensors would enable diagnosis at an early stage, from a patient’s bedside in the comfort of their own home, without the need for either specialised equipment or trained medical personnel.” If successful, these paper-based sensors could prove invaluable in rapidly testing for detection and diagnosis of conditions including cancer and infectious diseases such as influenza, HIV and tuberculosis.

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