Grant winners - 5 December 2013

December 5, 2013

National Institute for Health Research

Health Services and Delivery
Research programme

Cost-effectiveness of different levels of uptake of bariatric surgery in a large population: cohort study and Markov model

An evaluation of the effectiveness of annual health checks and quality of healthcare for adults with a learning disability

Health Technology Assessment programme

Which method is best for the induction of labour? A systematic review, network meta-analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis

 

Leverhulme Trust

Philip Leverhulme Prizes

These awards recognise early career researchers whose work has already had a significant international impact and whose future research career is exceptionally promising.

Modern languages and literature

Research on the specificity of literary thinking relative to other forms of thought in the early modern period

Geography

To develop a new concept of “disaster footprint” analysis in the field of climate change adaptation

Research Project Grants
Social sciences

Campus citizen behaviours: Predicting students’ prosocial behaviours

Collecting and analysing secondary covert social network data

Humanities

In living memory: the place and uses of learning poetry

Sciences

Prehistoric hunting strategies in Jordan: reconstructing prey behaviour and ecology

In detail

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Award winners: Collin Sones, Rob Eason, Spiros Garbis, Peter Smith and Saul Faust
Institution: University of Southampton
Value: more than £230,000

Laser-printable point-of-care sensors for low-cost medical diagnosis and disease monitoring

This research aims to develop robust, inexpensive, user-friendly, disposable paper-based sensors to detect biomarkers in cancer patients. It will explore whether Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) printing of biological materials can be used to develop the sensor device on paper. These sensors would be telemedicine-enabled, allowing transfer of valuable clinical diagnostic information between patients and their care team via mobile phones. According to Dr Sones: “The paper-based sensors would enable diagnosis at an early stage, from a patient’s bedside in the comfort of their own home, without the need for either specialised equipment or trained medical personnel.” If successful, these paper-based sensors could prove invaluable in rapidly testing for detection and diagnosis of conditions including cancer and infectious diseases such as influenza, HIV and tuberculosis.

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