Grant winners - 30 May 2013

May 30, 2013

National Institute for Health Research

Health Services and Delivery Research Programme

  • Award winner: Ellen Nolte
  • Institution: RAND Europe (Cambridge office)
  • Value: £99,939

Learning for the NHS on procurement and supply chain management: rapid evidence synthesis

Health Technology Assessment Programme

Late aneurysm-related mortality up to 15 years, secondary endovascular repair late sac rupture risk, and costs and cost-effectiveness implications in the United Kingdom EndoVascular Aneurysm Repair randomised controlled trials

  • Award winner: Nigel Klein
  • Institution: Institute of Child Health
  • Value: £61,850

Does short-cycle antiretroviral therapy impact on inflammation, immune activation, thrombo­genesis and CD4 cell dynamics?

Art therapy for people with non-psychotic mental disorders


Leverhulme Trust

Major Research Fellowships

Government, war and political culture in France, 1652-1661: the forgotten decade

Philip Leverhulme Prizes

Ancient Greek history

Earth, ocean and atmospheric sciences

Geophysical fluid dynamics

History of art

Visual culture and the construction of national identities

The history of modern and contemporary art in Britain and the Caribbean


Royal Society

Wolfson Research Merit Awards

Awards are worth £10,000-£30,000 a year, which is a salary enhancement.

Remote lakes as sensors and recorders of disturbed global biogeochemical cycles

Real-time feedback between microevolution and soil microbial community structure


In detail

European Commission

Award winner: Christian W. Haerpfer
Institution: University of Aberdeen
Value: €2,489,914

ARAB-TRANS: Political and Social Transformations in the Arab World

This project aims to compare seven Arab countries – Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Jordan and Iraq – to consider the root causes, ­evolution and future of the Arab Revolution. “We hope to discover whether long-term democratisation can co-exist in societies with a ­dominant Islamic population, and whether the ‘oil curse’ of autocratic regimes with massive natural resources can be replaced by the concept of ‘oil-rich democracy’,” Professor Haerpfer says.

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