Grant winners – 27 April 2017

A round-up of academics awarded research council funding

April 27, 2017
Grant winners tab on folder

National Institute for Health Research

Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation programme

IASO: a phase 2 randomised placebo-controlled double-blind trial of interleukin 1 blockade in acute severe colitis


Reducing asthma attacks in children using exhaled nitric oxide as a biomarker to inform treatment strategy – a randomised trial (RAACENO)


Health Services and Delivery Research programme

Interactional practices of decision-making during childbirth in maternity units


Health Technology Assessment programme

MS-STAT2: a phase 3 randomised, double-blind, clinical trial investigating the effectiveness of repurposed simvastatin compared with placebo in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, in slowing the progression of disability


Medical Research Council

How does inflammation regulate CLEC-2-mediated thrombosis after infection?


Calibration of multiple treatment comparisons using individual patient data


Understanding non-communicable diseases and the role of infection in Africa: building a partnership to generate big data


Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Research grants

EnvironSafe: cold plasma innovations for food safety and sustainability


Arginine methylation of BRD4 and its influence on transcription and genotoxic stress


In detail

Global Challenges Research Fund Foundation award

Award winner: William Kirk
Institution: Keele University
Value: £596,000

Improving food safety by reducing pesticide residues: developing a pheromone alternative to insecticides for control of thrips on legumes in Kenya

This project aims to offer an alternative to insecticides for controlling bean flower thrips – slender plant-eating insects – in cowpea (a herbaceous legume) and similar crops in Kenya. Using less pesticide will help to improve food safety, crop yields and farm workers’ health while fostering more sustainable agriculture. “Cowpea is a major crop across Africa south of the Sahara,” said William Kirk, senior lecturer in ecology and entomology in Keele University’s School of Life Sciences. “It’s an important source of protein to the urban and rural poor. Unfortunately, many smallholders apply chemical insecticides too frequently, so crops for domestic consumption often contain unacceptably high levels of pesticide residues.” The team will explore the use of a synthetic pheromone to attract and trap bean flower thrips – which are resistant to many insecticides – reducing the need for pesticides.

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