Features

Recent features

Capsized woman and boat

Early career academics can be left to sink or swim when navigating the choppy waters of learning scholarly writing. Helen Sword says a more formal, communal approach can help everyone, especially women

Donkey rides and polo players

John Morgan considers the hierarchies of prestige in higher education, the insights offered by big data research, and whether mixed-ability universities are the answer

Thorns and butterflies

Conditions that undermine the notion of scholarly vocation – relentless work, ubiquitous bureaucracy – can cause academics acute distress and spur them to quit, says Ruth Barcan

Bums out in Magaluf

With the holiday season upon us, five academics suggest some unique destinations you may want to consider – or perhaps not

World in Focus

Pro-democracy protester, Causeway Bay district, Hong Kong, 2014

In a special report from the territory, David Matthews hears concerns that scholars are paying the price for ‘politically incorrect’ talk

The Outer Limits

Singing mice

From the Victorian slum-dwellers whose lives were transformed after they found a warbling rodent, to the jazz-like sound of mouse music, Richard Sugg says that if you take strange stories seriously, you may find something beautiful

Essays

Person in ghillie suit reading on bench

Joe Moran on the little-known benefits of being a shrinking violet

Feature illustration (3 September 2015)

Dale Salwak explains why he focuses on the people carrying out the translation process and their effects on the text we read

Group of people with road signs over mouths

Lincoln Allison argues that it is becoming harder for academics to share controversial ideas

In the workplace and at the ballot box, it is time to reject stale ideology, says Thomas Docherty

Profiles

Shakespeare and Plato fist-fighting in field

Are you an idealist or a pragmatist? In his latest book, Self and Soul, Edmundson aims to provide fresh insights into how we might choose to live our lives

From the archive

Enthusiasm for ‘neuroeducation’ risks blinding people to its potentially limited efficacy, argues Steven Rose

Culture

Dorothy M. Richardson portrait

One hundred years after transforming the modern novel, Dorothy M. Richardson’s neglected works are being reclaimed, says Rebecca Bowler

Review: Gemma Bovery, starring Gemma Arterton and Fabrice Luchini

Despite many attempts, Gustave Flaubert’s tale of adultery remains resistant to adaptation, says Philip Kemp

Chris Spyrides and Trudy Weiss in Crossing Jerusalem, Park Theatre, London

A Jewish writer fills a vacuum with a play about Israel that refuses to take a simple view as it foregrounds an erotic older woman. Matthew Reisz writes

Review: Ben Whishaw and Kevin Harvey in Bakkhai by Euripides, by Anne Carson

A witty version of the Greek tragedy confronts our desire to watch the unwatchable as it diverts our focus from binaries to transitioning, says Liz Schafer

Most Commented

Daniel Mitchell illustration (29 June 2017)

Academics who think they can do the work of professional staff better than professional staff themselves are not showing the kind of respect they expect from others

As the pay of BBC on-air talent is revealed, one academic comes clean about his salary

Senior academics at Teesside University put at risk of redundancy as summer break gets under way

Capsized woman and boat

Early career academics can be left to sink or swim when navigating the choppy waters of learning scholarly writing. Helen Sword says a more formal, communal approach can help everyone, especially women

Thorns and butterflies

Conditions that undermine the notion of scholarly vocation – relentless work, ubiquitous bureaucracy – can cause academics acute distress and spur them to quit, says Ruth Barcan