Appointments

November 12, 2009

A new pro vice-chancellor has been appointed at the University of Bath. Bernard Morley, currently director of the Graduate School of Life Sciences and Medicine at Imperial College London, will take up the post of pro vice-chancellor for learning and teaching in March 2010, replacing Ian Jamieson, who is retiring after 24 years at Bath. Professor Morley has previously held positions at the University of California, San Francisco and the Medical Research Council's immunochemistry unit at the University of Oxford.

The London branch of an international network of campuses established by New York University (NYU) has appointed two new members of staff. Eric Sneddon takes on a post as associate director at NYU London, joining from Central College, Iowa, where he was director of international operations. Stephen Ian Martin, an author and researcher specialising in the histories of minorities in the UK, joins as visiting professor in creative writing.

The director of development and alumni relations at City University London, Chris Gethin, is moving to the University of Surrey. Mr Gethin, who will take on the same role at his new institution, has more than 20 years' experience in fundraising, communications and marketing in the non-profit sector. He will start in his new post in January 2010.

A professor has been charged with helping to improve the nation's health, with an appointment to a government fruit and veg task force. Gareth Edwards-Jones has been handed the role by Hilary Benn, Environment Secretary. The professor of agriculture and land-use studies at Bangor University will join agricultural researchers, farmers, retailers and consumers on the Fruit and Vegetables Task Force, which is to develop an action plan to increase growing and consumption of fresh produce in England.

Catherine Baxter has taken up the role of university college secretary at Harper Adams University College. The role will replace the post of director of corporate affairs at the institution, previously held by principal David Llewellyn. A former pro vice-chancellor (administration) at Glyndwr University, Dr Baxter helped the institution to win university status and degree-awarding powers. In another previous role, she helped the University of Nottingham set up its campus in Malaysia.

A former director of nursing and education at Great Ormond Street Hospital has been appointed to a post at London South Bank University. Judith Ellis, who started her career as a registered general nurse at St Thomas' Hospital in London, is the new executive dean for the Faculty of Health and Social Care. She was appointed to the Department of Health as a nursing officer for quality in 1997, a role that saw her improving patient participation and developing clinical practice benchmarking.

An academic has won an award for inspirational teaching after being nominated by former students. David Groome, a senior academic in psychology at the University of Westminster, was presented with the British Psychological Society's Excellence in the Teaching of Psychology Award for 2009. Having taught at Westminster since 1970, Dr Groome has written and edited several psychology textbooks for undergraduates.

A black academic has been included in the annual Black Power List for the second consecutive year. Cynthia Pine is dean of Salford's faculty of health and social care, and is the first woman to have been appointed dean of a UK dental school. The list names the UK's 100 "most influential" people of African or African-Caribbean heritage, and features figures such as John Sentamu, Archbishop of York, and David Lammy, Minister for Higher Education.

The leader of an illustration course at the University of Worcester has been awarded a prize for his work in a children's book. Piet Grobler was presented with the Golden Apple prize at the 2009 Biennial of Illustration Bratislava. He won the honour for illustrations in a book by the Mexican poet Jorge Lujan. Mr Grobler previously taught at Stellenbosch University and the Cape Peninsula University of Technology.

A professor of infectious diseases at St George's, University of London, has been elected a distinguished fellow of the Irish College of Physicians. George Griffin was honoured for his contribution to the field of clinical medicine.

The watchdog responsible for resolving student complaints has appointed two deputy adjudicators. Felicity Mitchell, a barrister, and Susanna Reece, who has handled complaints for various professional bodies, take on their positions with the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education following the retirement of Mike Reddy, deputy adjudicator.

The deputy vice-chancellor of Swansea Metropolitan University has retired. Ken Reid is an education expert who made a significant contribution to a Welsh Assembly government scheme to promote positive behaviour and attendance in schools. He joined Swansea Met years ago and held roles including reader, head of school and dean. He has been offered an emeritus professorship by the university.

Biochemist Helen Vincent has been appointed by the University of Portsmouth to investigate ways of deceiving deadly cholera-causing bacteria. Dr Vincent has secured the Marie Curie International Reintegration Award, a EUR50,000 (£44,750) prize to work in the UK after six years in the US. The award aims to reverse the "brain drain" of scientists to America, and allows Dr Vincent to examine what activates the bacteria to help develop anti-cholera drugs.

Bucks New University has added to its nursing provision with the appointment of two visiting professors. David Foster is deputy chief nursing officer at the Department of Health, a role in which he works on issues in the nursing and midwifery fields, including education, research and minority ethnic issues. He will be joined by Janice Sigsworth, director of nursing at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, who is a former deputy chief nurse for England. They are both joining the nursing and healthcare team at Bucks.

A former Ministry of Defence trainer and civil litigation author has been recruited by City University London's law school. Dominic Regan will join the school as an honorary visiting professor, and will be involved in the transition of the current Bar Vocational Course to the Bar Professional Training Course next year. He is an expert in alternative dispute resolution.

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