Grant winners – 7 May 2015

May 7, 2015

Leverhulme Trust

Research Project Grants
Humanities

European Celtic art in context: exploring Celtic art and its Eastern links


Sciences

  • Award winner: Michael Hough
  • Institution: University of Essex
  • Value: £173,794

Enzyme catalysis in action: 3D movies of X-ray induced chemical reactions in protein crystals


The impact of cell growth and cell size on protein noise and phenotypic variability

 

National Institute for Health Research

Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation programme

  • Award winner: Carsten Flohr
  • Institution: King’s College London
  • Value: £796,355

Assessing the efficacy and safety of methotrexate v ciclosporin in the treatment of severe atopic eczema in children: the treatment of severe atopic eczema in children task force (TREAT) randomised controlled trial


Health Services and Delivery Research programme

Delivering primary healthcare to homeless people: an evaluation of the integration, effectiveness and costs of different models

 

British Academy

British Academy Awards

  • Award winner: Katherine Tonkiss
  • Institution: Aston University
  • Value: £6,300

Examining the transmission of policy narratives by organised publics in migration debates in the UK and Australia


Reconstructing a lost language: remnants of Western Yiddish in northern Germany

 

Arts and Humanities Research Council

Research grant

Phronesis and the medical community

In detail

James Kelly, Durham University

Award winner: James Kelly
Institution: Durham University
Value: £185,190

Monks in motion: a prosopographical study of the English and Welsh Benedictines in exile, 1553-1800

This project will investigate the changing political role in England of English Benedictine monks abroad. After the banning of some central aspects of Roman Catholic practice, including the formation of communities of religious, the first English Benedictine monastery in exile was established in Douai (in northern France) in 1607. But even before this, there had been English novitiates who had joined European communities and entered religious life in Catholic countries such as Spain. Their transnational existence made them bridges between the Continent and England. To study these transnational networks, researchers will create a dynamic, searchable database of the membership and activities of English Benedictines from the reign of Mary I to 1800. The project, which will explore the position of the four monasteries defined as English institutions in Europe, will be crucial in reimagining the Catholic community during the period of religious proscription. An open source electronic database of all English Benedictines will allow a range of users, including family historians as well as scholars, to access material about each individual.

Times Higher Education free 30-day trial

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Assistant Recruitment - Human Resources Office

University Of Nottingham Ningbo China

Outreach Officer

Gsm London

Professorship in Geomatics

Norwegian University Of Science & Technology -ntnu

Professor of European History

Newcastle University

Head of Department

University Of Chichester
See all jobs

Most Commented

men in office with feet on desk. Vintage

Three-quarters of respondents are dissatisfied with the people running their institutions

students use laptops

Researchers say students who use computers score half a grade lower than those who write notes

Canal houses, Amsterdam, Netherlands

All three of England’s for-profit universities owned in Netherlands

sitting by statue

Institutions told they have a ‘culture of excluding postgraduates’ in wake of damning study

A face made of numbers looks over a university campus

From personalising tuition to performance management, the use of data is increasingly driving how institutions operate