Grant winners – 28 July 2016

A round-up of recent recipients of research council cash

July 28, 2016
Grant winners tab on folder

Leverhulme Trust

Research project grants
Sciences

Timescales of multisensory recalibration in natural environments


  • Award winner: Emmanuel Pothos
  • Institution: City University London
  • Value: £111,895

A quantum approach to decision making in Bernoulli’s St Petersburg’s paradox


Understanding the epigenetics of alternative splicing in the plant clock genes


National Institute for Health Research

Health Technology Assessment programme

REBALANCE: review of behaviour and lifestyle interventions for severe obesity: an evidence synthesis


Public Health Research programme

RISKIT-CJS – pragmatic randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a multi-component intervention to reduce substance use and risk-behaviour in adolescents engaged with the criminal justice system


Economic and Social Research Council

Research grants

Women empowerment, social norms and domestic violence


Delivering inclusive financial development and growth


Youth extremisms: understanding across ideological and religious contexts (research seminar series)


Digital interfaces and debt: understanding mediated decision-making processes in high cost short term credit products


In detail

Award winner: Felicity Thomas
Institution: University of Exeter
Value: £484,706

Poverty, pathology and pills: moral narratives and the medicalisation of distress

Provision of effective treatment and support for mental distress is a key target for government and organisations such as the mental health charity Mind. Yet despite an urgent need to tackle health inequality, current strategies frame mental distress as a psychological problem that lies within the individual concerned. This not only presumes that distress can be “corrected” through medical treatment, but also covers up factors often underlying the root causes of suffering – poverty and unemployment, for example. Concurrently, policies restricting welfare support and popular media deploy moralising narratives to reinforce beliefs that people are responsible for their own circumstances and actions. This project aims to explore how these narratives impact on the ways people in low-income communities perceive and respond to mental distress caused by material deprivation and social disadvantage, and will examine the impacts of this on their well-being.

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