THE in Davos: Universities in a period of upheaval (video)

Phil Baty reports from the World Economic Forum in Davos

January 19, 2017
Interconnected world/global roaming

Times Higher Education's World University Rankings editor, Phil Baty, reports from the World Economic Forum 2017 in Davos, where he has been speaking to university leaders from across the world. 

In a week where Donald Trump is set to become the 45th president of the United States, we hear how universities – and the principles for which they stand – will outlast short-term periods of political tumult.  

In this report, we hear from: Subra Suresh, president of Carnegie Mellon University; Lino Guzzella, president of ETH Zurich – Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich; Tony Chan, president of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology; Steve Kang, president of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST); Atsushi Seike, president of Keio University; and Martin Vatterli, president of École  Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne.

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