UCL’s Magnus keeps blood flow research innovations in-house

Start-up aims to sidestep big pharmaceutical firms by developing its lab discoveries inside the university’s walls. Plus the latest higher education appointments

February 12, 2015

Source: Rex

Driving innovation: challenges too big for big pharma can be tackled in a university setting, a cardiovascular specialist says

One London university is turning the traditional model for exploiting discoveries made at the lab bench on its head.

Instead of spinning out a new company from an institution with the hope of commercialising their research, a group at University College London has spun the commercial know-how needed to build a successful life sciences business into the walls of its institution.

Magnus Life Science, as the company is known, is developing a series of therapies that centre on a better understanding of blood flow in the body. In doing so it hopes to find new treatments for diseases.

It is the brainchild of John Martin, professor of cardiovascular medicine at UCL, who owns the intellectual property to the suite of innovations that the company hopes to commercialise.

“The key idea was to reverse the relationship between university and industry,” said Professor Martin at the company’s launch event on 29 January. “For too long we have asked industry what can we do for them, as contractors.”

With Magnus, Professor Martin hopes to “drive the agenda towards industry” and take the innovations right through to the stage of being tested for efficacy using the National Health Service before handing them over to pharmaceutical companies.

Products include a biomagnetic and biodegradable stent, a therapy to tackle diabetes-linked cardiovascular problems and a treatment for placental insufficiency in pregnancy.

One of the products involves “antagonising the interaction between two very big proteins” in a “chemical problem that is too big for big pharma”, he said.

“We believe because we are in the university that we can out-think the problem in a way that big pharma could not do,” he added.

“There has been a failure of big pharma and we need a new approach. You cannot put a thousand people in a glass tower and say ‘discover something’; discovery occurs in the university,” said Professor Martin.

The venture has managed to secure £15.5 million in private equity funding, as well as €11.5 million (£8.6 million) from the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme. It expects to begin clinical tests on one product later this year.

Professor Martin acknowledges that it is an “incredibly fast pace of movement”, and said it is down to the project’s management, which is led by chief executive David Campbell and includes specialists with backgrounds in finance, regulation and the life sciences industry. They are based at UCL so they can work “hand in hand” with the academics, said Dr Campbell.

The fact that Magnus is “embedded” in the university is “key to the model”, explained Professor Martin. Scientists from UCL work on each of the five therapeutic areas that the company focuses on, and have an equity share in the company.

Dr Campbell said keeping the innovations inside the university added value to the science.

“We do not want to take the baby away from mum too early because we absolutely believe that you are taking the innovation away from that nurturing environment where it can thrive,” he said.

If it followed the traditional route, Magnus would be “deposited” in a biotechnology park in Cambridge or Norwich and left to spend an “awful lot of money” on capital equipment and expensive management, he added.

“What we have been able to do is spend money on the things that are important to us, which is the science,” said Dr Campbell.

holly.else@tesglobal.com

Appointments

Ben Calvert, dean of the Faculty of Media, Arts and Technology at the University of Gloucestershire, will join the University of South Wales in April as its new pro vice-chancellor for learning, teaching and student experience.

Aberystwyth University has announced the appointment of Mike Christie as the new head of the School of Management and Business.

Robert Gordon University has announced its annual awards of professorships and readers. Simon Burnett, of the Research Institute for Management Governance and Society, and Lesley Diack, of the School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, have become professors, while Giovanna Bermano, Andrew Lamb and Kay Cooper have been made readers.

Julie Hall has been appointed deputy provost of the University of Roehampton, where she will be responsible for all academic departments and the student experience.

The University of York has appointed Tom Stoneham as dean of the newly established Graduate Research School.

Dame Wendy Hall, director of the Web Science Institute at the University of Southampton, has been named a founding member of a new International Council on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, launched in the United Arab Emirates.

Times Higher Education free 30-day trial

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

question marks PhD study

Selecting the right doctorate is crucial for success. Robert MacIntosh and Kevin O'Gorman share top 10 tips on how to pick a PhD

India, UK, flag

Sir Keith Burnett reflects on what he learned about international students while in India with the UK prime minister

Pencil lying on open diary

Requesting a log of daily activity means that trust between the institution and the scholar has broken down, says Toby Miller

Application for graduate job
Universities producing the most employable graduates have been ranked by companies around the world in the Global University Employability Ranking 2016
Construction workers erecting barriers

Directly linking non-EU recruitment to award levels in teaching assessment has also been under consideration, sources suggest