Grant Winners

March 31, 2011

ACTION MEDICAL RESEARCH

Research Training Fellowships

• Award winner: Miriam Schmidts

• Institution: University College London

• Value: £176,583

Study into the molecular basis of Jeune syndrome (also called ATD), aiming to identify and investigate genes that cause ATD

• Award winner: David Wilkinson

• Institution: Alder Hey Children's Hospital/ University of Liverpool

• Value: £139,980

Study into stem-cell therapy for Hirschsprung's disease to develop treatment using a baby's own stem cells to improve nerve supply to the gut

• Award winner: Rebecca Hill

• Institution: Newcastle University

• Value: £204,861

The biological mechanisms of disease relapse in childhood medulloblastoma

THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH

Health Technology Assessment awards

• Award winner: Stefan Priebe

• Institution: The Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry

• Value: £1,441,687

Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of body psychotherapy in the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial

• Award winner: Debi Bhattacharya

• Institution: University of East Anglia

• Value: £368,982

A pilot study of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of multi-compartment medication devices

• Award winner: Mike Crawford

• Institution: Imperial College London

• Value: £284,330

Alcohol misuse and sexual health: a randomised trial of brief intervention among people attending sexual health clinics

ARTS AND HUMANITIES RESEARCH COUNCIL

• Award winner: Jerri Daboo

• Institution: University of Exeter

• Value: £165,262

The Southall story: a cultural history of Britain's "Little India" since 1979

• Award winner: Mustafa Dikec

• Institution: Royal Holloway, University of London

• Value: £165,101

Pumping time: geographies of temporal infrastructure in fin-de-siècle Paris

IN DETAIL

• Award winner: John Yarnold

• Institution: Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust/Institute of Cancer Research

• Value: £2,912,198

Fast-Forward

Fast-Forward is a randomised clinical trial testing a one-week course of curative whole breast radiotherapy against a standard three-week schedule in terms of local cancer control and late adverse effects in women with early breast cancer. Curative radiotherapy prescribed to women in the UK with the disease currently involves 15 treatments: however, it is possible that fewer treatments can work. This trial tests a five-fraction schedule delivered in one week against the UK 15-fraction standard. If the one-week treatment is shown to be as effective and safe as the three-week regimen, there will be obvious benefits for patients and the NHS.

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