Grant winners – 14 May 2015

May 14, 2015

Leverhulme Trust

Major research fellowships

A critical edition of the apostolic processus of Santa Rosa de Lima (1586-1617)


History’s form: aesthetics and the past in the Romantic age


Losing time and temper: the battle over clocks and timetables, 1840-1914


Research project grants
Sciences

Using spectrometric and genetic techniques for new fluorometabolites discovery

 

British Academy

British Academy Awards

Exploring the impact that tax havens have on firm-level performances with a cross-country perspective to uncover whether there is heterogeneity among firms from different nations


Exploring methods supporting the development of future and current middle managers in planning successful careers


  • Grant winner: Ian Combe (with Claire Howell)
  • Institution: Aston University
  • Value: £9,402

Understanding the lack of trademarks in the exploitation of innovation in small and medium-sized enterprises

 

National Institute for Health Research

Health Technology Assessment programme

  • Award winner: John Gerard Lawrenson
  • Institution: City University London
  • Value: £216,597

WIDER-EYES: What works to increase attendance for diabetic retinopathy screening? An evidence synthesis


Uterotonic drugs for preventing post-partum haemorrhage: a network meta-analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis


Health Services and Delivery Research programme

Interventions to improve antimicrobial prescribing of doctors in training: a realist review

In detail

Pauline Rose, <a href=University of Cambridge" src="/Pictures/web/h/c/x/pauline-rose-university-of-cambridg_150.jpg" />

Economic and Social Research Council ESRC-DFID Raising Learning Outcomes programme

Award winner: Pauline Rose
Institution: University of Cambridge
Value: £457,732

Learning outcomes and teacher effectiveness for children facing multiple disadvantages, including those with disabilities: India and Pakistan

The project aims to identify strategies to raise learning outcomes for all children, regardless of background. In low-income countries, disadvantaged learners often face poor-quality teaching. The study will identify the most important aspects for improving learning in order to inform government strategies. The team will assess children in the household and also at school to ensure depth of data. The study will help to make sure that teachers are able to support all children to fulfil their potential.

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