Graduate employment rates rise

Most higher education institutions had graduate employment levels between 90 and 95 per cent, with 25 institutions having rates above 95 per cent, the latest destination statistics for university-leavers showed last week

July 10, 2014

Outside small and specialist institutions, Robert Gordon University had the highest rate for graduates in employment or further study (97.7 per cent), according to Higher Education Statistics Agency data looking at the activity of 2012‑13 graduates six months after leaving university.

Next most successful were the University of Buckingham (97.3 per cent), the University of Derby (96.7 per cent) and the University of Surrey (96.9 per cent).

At the other end of the scale, the data showed five institutions with a graduate employment rate of 85 per cent or lower. They included London Metropolitan University (81.4 per cent), the University of Bolton (82.4 per cent) and Staffordshire University (84 per cent).

In 2012-13, the overall graduate employment rate rose for a second successive year to 92.1 per cent, up from 90.8 per cent in the previous year. However, it remains below pre-recession levels.

jack.grove@tsleducation.com

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