All change at Southampton as new structure is unveiled

Seven new deans have been appointed by the University of Southampton after the research-intensive institution reorganised its academic structure.

The university, which has more than 22,000 students and 5,000 staff, has replaced its system of three faculties and several schools with eight new faculties.

All the faculties bar one have a newly appointed dean: five already held posts at the institution, while two were recruited from other universities.

Don Nutbeam, vice-chancellor of Southampton, said public funding cuts meant that the institution needed “an even greater focus on research quality”.

“It also means transforming the structure, quality and flexibility of our educational programmes, so that by 2012 we are offering students a much greater choice of learning options,” he added.

The faculties are: engineering and the environment; natural and environmental sciences; physical and applied sciences; social and human sciences; humanities; medicine; health sciences; and business and law.

Among the new deans is leading computer scientist Dame Wendy Hall, who has been made head of the Faculty of Physical and Applied Sciences.

The two external appointments are Judith Petts, formerly pro vice-chancellor at the University of Birmingham, and Stephen Hawkins, who joins from Bangor University.

A dean has yet to be posted to the Faculty of Business and Law.

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