Grant winners

August 8, 2013

Economic and Social Research Council

Transformative Research Call: ‘Transforming’ Social Science

Maximum limit of £250,000; will run for 18 months.

Physiology, identity and behaviour: a neuropolitical perspective

‘Off the grid’: relational infrastructures for fragile futures

  • Award winner: Nikolas Rose
  • Institution: King’s College London

A new sociology for a new century: transforming the relations between sociology and neuroscience through a study of mental life and the city

  • Award winner: Hilary Graham
  • Institution: University of York

Health of populations and ecosystems (HOPE)

Leverhulme Trust

International Networks
Humanities

  • Award winner: Alison Brown
  • Institution: University of Aberdeen
  • Value: £50,731

Blackfoot collections in UK museums: reviving relationships through artefacts

  • Award winner: Daniel Grimley
  • Institution: University of Oxford
  • Value: £118,154

Hearing landscape critically: music, place and the spaces of sound

National Institute for Health Research

Health Services and Delivery Research Programme

Decommissioning healthcare: identifying best practice through primary and secondary research

  • Award winner: Richard Thomson
  • Institution: Newcastle University
  • Value: £241,345

Understanding clinicians’ decisions to offer intravenous thrombolytic treatment to patients with acute ischaemic stroke: a discrete choice experiment

Culturally adapted family intervention (CaFI) for African Caribbeans with schizophrenia and their families: a feasibility study of implementation and acceptability

  • Award winner: Alison Eastwood
  • Institution: University of York
  • Value: £170,840

The delivery of chemotherapy at home: an evidence synthesis

Arts and Humanities Research Council

Responsive Mode Grants

  • Award winner: Jeremy Johns
  • Institution: University of Oxford
  • Value: £701,073

Online corpus of the inscriptions of ancient North Arabia

In detail

Award winner: Greville G. Corbett
Institution: University of Surrey
Value: £3,633

Combining gender and classifiers in natural language

In many languages, nouns are systematically categorised into groups. In a gender system, this is based on sex: nouns are treated as either masculine or feminine. Quite a different approach is taken by languages with classifier systems. Here, categorisation is based on fine-grained meaning. Generally, a language will use only one system – either gender or classifiers – but in a few interesting cases both systems are used. How such fundamentally different systems interact within a single language has not yet been seriously considered, but it could potentially uncover a great deal about the interaction of semantics, morphology and cognitive categories.

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