Grant winners - 1 May 2014

May 1, 2014

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Research grants

Functional properties of a mobile organelle expressing type 2 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors

Stomatal-based systems analysis of water use efficiency

 

Economic and Social Research Council

ESRC/DFID Joint scheme for poverty alleviation research

Engaging teachers in peace-building in post-conflict contexts: evaluating education interventions in Liberia and Sierra Leone

  • Award winner: Robin Burgess
  • Institution: London School of Economics
  • Value: £410,311

Basic entrepreneurship: a means for transforming the economic lives of the poor?

 

Leverhulme Trust

Research Project Grants
Sciences

Phase space analysis on nilpotent Lie groups

Carbon sequestration from wildfires? Quantifying the role of pyrogenic carbon

Connecting the high and low energy views of the Milky Way

A clean and versatile route to hierarchical structured functional devices

Humanities

Housing, everyday life and well-being over the long term in Glasgow c.1950–1975

 

Arts and Humanities Research Council

  • Award winner: Pól Ó Dochartaigh
  • Institution: University of Ulster
  • Value: £408,376

Representations of Jews in Irish literature

Dirhams for slaves: dirham hoards from Northern Europe, trade in Slavic slaves, and the emergence of medieval Europe

In detail

Award winner: Alice Bell
Institution: Sheffield Hallam University
Value: £194,5 (of £239,930)

Reading digital fiction

The project aims to raise awareness of and engagement with digital fiction – fiction that is written for and read from a computer, and can be web- or app-based (for tablets and smartphones) or accessed via CD-ROMs – and increase digital literacies more broadly. Researchers will consider how readers process the multimodal aspects of digital fiction and investigate the relationship between what readers expect to happen in the narrative as a consequence of their actions and what they actually find. Finally, it will look at whether different forms of narration affect the relationship between the reader of digital fiction and the fictional world it describes.

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