Welsh universities push for students at Nafsa

Welsh universities have created a new initiative to attract more international students.

May 25, 2015

Study in Wales was set to be launched on 25 May at the annual conference of Nafsa, the US’s international education association, being held in Boston, Massachusetts.

A website for the brand profiles Wales’s history and culture as well as its higher education institutions. It also provides practical information on how overseas learners can apply.

Colin Riordan, the chair of Universities Wales and the vice-chancellor of Cardiff University, said: “Following the recent excellent set of results for Welsh universities in the research excellence framework exercise, we are keen to promote what Wales has to offer as a premier international destination for students – both inside and outside the classroom. 

“Our campuses are amongst the most diverse in the UK, and we firmly believe that we can offer a unique, vibrant and enriching student experience that will be of benefit to prospective students, our universities and to wider Welsh society.”

In 2013-14 there were more than 25,000 international students studying in Wales, from in excess of 170 countries, Universities Wales said. These students made up about 13 per cent of the overall student population that year.

Professor Riordan thanked the British Council, Visit Wales and the Welsh government for their support of the Study in Wales initiative.

chris.havergal@tesglobal.com

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