Students win prize for 3D recreation of old London

A group of students have won a major prize by using videogame technology to create a 3D 17th-century environment from historic British Library maps.

October 27, 2013

The Off the Map challenge allowed participants to choose between visual material from 17th-century London, Stonehenge and the pyramids at Gizeh.

It was sponsored by game developer Crytek and run in conjunction with the British Library and GameCity, the annual videogame festival at Nottingham Trent University.

In the event, the prize went to Pudding Lane Productions, a team of six second-year students from De Montfort University, for their three-dimensional fly-through of 17th-century London’s close-packed streets and lanes.

“Some of these vistas would not look at all out of place as special effects in a Hollywood studio production,” said judge Tom Harper, curator of cartographic materials at the British Library.

“The haze effect lying over the city is brilliant, and great attention has been given to key features of London Bridge, the wooden structure of Queenshithe on the river, even the glittering window casements.”

Pudding Lane Productions’ success was announced at a special event to showcase the best Off the Map entries during the 8th GameCity festival, which took place in Nottingham last week.

matthew.reisz@tsleducation.com

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