South Africa and UK launch joint research initiative

Universities in two countries will co-host three research chairs

May 6, 2016
South Africa flag

South Africa’s minister of science and technology has launched a bilateral research initiative between her country and the UK, to support research into security, science, technology and political theory.

Naledi Pandor announced the launch of three bilateral research chairs at the British Council’s Going Global conference in Cape Town on 5 May. Each chair will receive £300,000 over the next three years from the British Council’s Newton Fund programme, with those funds to be matched by the National Research Foundation of South Africa.

The chairs are Stephen Devereux, research chair in food security at the University of the Western Cape; Michael John Roberts, research chair in food security at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University; and Lawrence Hamilton, research chair in political theory at the University of the Witwatersrand. They will be co-hosted by universities in the UK.

The programme is designed to strengthen research and innovation in the two countries and promote international exchange and cooperation. The participating universities aim to increase the quality and quantity of master’s and PhD graduates.

Colm McGivern, South Africa director at the British Council, said international research collaboration is “central to economic growth and development” and the initiative will “build the relationships and create the knowledge that will power the future for both countries”.

ellie.bothwell@tesglobal.com

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