Russia business school head: academics can ‘keep the world together’

Konstantin Krotov also speaks of ‘full support’ for Turkish academic in light of Russian-Turkish diplomatic tension

December 4, 2015
Konstantin Krotov, Saint Petersburg State University, Roland Siegers, CEMS
Source: GSOM SPbU
Konstantin Krotov (left), managing director of the Graduate School of Management, Saint Petersburg State University, with Roland Siegers, executive director of CEMS

At a time when political tensions are making diplomatic relationships uneasy, the global academy is doing its part to show how higher education transcends nationality.

In an interview with Times Higher Education Konstantin Krotov, head of Saint Petersburg State University’s Graduate School of Management (GSOM), said that it was important to keep this network as intact as possible in response to political turmoil.

Professor Krotov was speaking at an event organised by the Global Alliance in Management Education (CEMS), which was held in St Petersburg on 25-29 November.

CEMS is a 29-strong member organisation of leading international business schools and corporate institutions focused on educating the global business leaders of the future.

Its mission statement says that it is dedicated to preparing future generations to enter a “multilingual, multicultural and interconnected business world”, and Professor Krotov added that this could be expanded into wider higher education.

“Who but the academics should keep the world together?” he asked. “From this perspective we try to be as open, international and transparent as possible.”

“We have international professors. One of them is Turkish. We had a conversation yesterday; we fully support him, and we want him to stay,” Professor Krotov said in reference to diplomatic tensions that have followed the shooting down by Turkey on 24 November of a Russian fighter jet over the Turkish-Syrian border.

“He’s really concerned and uncertain now about his situation because overnight it’s now a completely different situation. Who knows what the government might do: maybe cancel all visas or whatever else.

“So it’s really hard. He has full support from us. He is a great addition to our faculty, and we will continue to look for more highly qualified international professors.”

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