Nigel Lindsey, 1956-2012

April 12, 2012

Although he began his career as a non-medical scientific officer at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield, Nigel Lindsey went on to become a leading advocate of innovative teaching in higher education.

In 1986, he moved to the University of Sheffield's department of medicine as a postdoctoral research assistant and published in the areas of transplantation, immunology and rheumatology.

Professor Lindsey joined the University of Bradford in 1992 as a lecturer in the department of biomedical sciences, and in 2003 was made senior lecturer in cellular pathology at its School of Life Sciences. Recognition of his commitment to high-quality teaching came the following year with his appointment as the school's second associate dean for learning and teaching.

In addition to his contributions to the biomedical science curriculum, Professor Lindsey was keen to endorse innovative teaching and assessment methods that he believed would benefit students. His colleague Michael Cox, the school's associate dean for learning and teaching and senior lecturer in optometry at Bradford, said he had "an interest in thinking about the university educational experience from the student's point of view. And that meant all students, hence his interest in inclusivity."

Professor Lindsey was an early adopter of lecture podcasts - and wasn't afraid to advocate their use.

Peter Lassey, associate dean for learning and teaching in Bradford's School of Lifelong Education and Development, recalled: "Nigel always had time for people...he was willing to debate and reconsider. However, that did not stop him being a tenacious fighter for the causes that he believed in."

Professor Lindsey carried out research into the understanding of antibodies (and jointly received grants for this work), co-authored book chapters, published reviews and held a patent. In recognition of his work, Bradford made him a professor in 2008, and he soon became its first director of learning and teaching. Although he developed motor neurone disease shortly thereafter, he continued working until the week before he died.

Paying tribute, Mr Lassey said: "It has been an inspiration to see the way he continued to make his own choices about his life. Although latterly it was difficult for him to contribute during fast-moving discussions in meetings, he still managed to ask the key questions that got right to the heart of the debate.

"Nigel has had an enormous impact on the university. His legacy, however, is not in [its] structures...but in the people; it is in the example he provided."

Professor Lindsey died on 11 February and is survived by his wife Julia and two children.

chloe.darracott-cankovic@tsleducation.com.

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