Newcastle University looks close to home for new v-c

Tyneside-educated scientist to lead institution from next year

July 11, 2016
chris day newcastle
Source: istock
Newcastle University has appointed liver disease scientist Chris Day as its next vice-chancellor

A born-and-raised Geordie is to become the next vice-chancellor of Newcastle University.

Chris Day, Newcastle’s pro vice-chancellor for the Faculty of Medical Sciences, will begin his term of office in early January when current head Chris Brink retires, the Russell Group university announced on 11 July.

The 56-year-old liver disease expert, who went to state school in the North East, described his appointment as a “huge honour”, saying he would be “privileged to be able to lead such a wonderful university with so many talented and dedicated staff and students”.

Professor Day trained as a doctor at the University of Cambridge and the city’s Addenbrooke’s Hospital before returning to Newcastle in 1985 to work at the Freeman Hospital.

He quickly moved in to the field of liver medicine and in 1987 took up his first research post at Newcastle, where he later became head of the School of Clinical Medical Sciences.

As a pro vice-chancellor for medical sciences since 2007, he has led the development of major new research centres including the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre in Ageing and Chronic Diseases and the Wellcome Trust Centre for Mitochondrial Disease, as well as setting up the UK’s only overseas medical campus in Malaysia.

Most recently, he led the successful bid to establish a National Centre for Ageing Science and Innovation in Newcastle, securing £20 million from government.

Professor Day, who was appointed vice-president of the Academy of Medical Sciences (Clinical) – one of the highest honours in UK medicine – last year, also has research medals from the Royal College of Physicians and the British Society of Gastroenterology. 

Mark I'Anson, chair of Newcastle's governing council, who led the appointment panel, said Day’s “passion for the university and the contribution it makes to the lives of staff, students and the city of Newcastle is evident in everything that he does”.

“He appreciates the profound effect education can have in improving the life chances of young people, because of his own background, and he is committed to building on the strengths of Newcastle University to ensure more people benefit from its work,” he said.

Mr I’Anson also paid tribute to outgoing vice-chancellor Chris Brink, whom, he said, had “led the university superbly over the past nine years”.

jack.grove@tesglobal.com

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Student Hub Advisor

Greenwich School Of Management Ltd

Data Systems Administrator

Greenwich School Of Management Ltd

Deputy Vice Chancellor

University Of Cumbria

Professor in English Literature

University Of Glasgow
See all jobs

Most Commented

Doctoral study can seem like a 24-7 endeavour, but don't ignore these other opportunities, advise Robert MacIntosh and Kevin O'Gorman

Matthew Brazier illustration (9 February 2017)

How do you defeat Nazis and liars? Focus on the people in earshot, says eminent Holocaust scholar Deborah Lipstadt

Improvement, performance, rankings, success

Phil Baty sets out why the World University Rankings are here to stay – and why that's a good thing

Warwick vice-chancellor Stuart Croft on why his university reluctantly joined the ‘flawed’ teaching excellence framework

people dressed in game of thrones costume

Old Germanic languages are back in vogue, but what value are they to a modern-day graduate? Alice Durrans writes