Laptops and tablets in ascendancy for student viewing

Only one in five students will take a TV to university, with most relying on their laptop or smartphone to view programmes, a new survey shows

July 22, 2013

The decline of the student mainstay is revealed by insurance company Endsleigh, which polled around 1,700 students about their possessions.

Only 20 per cent of students now own a separate TV (down 17 per cent on 2012), 17 per cent of students have a stand-alone stereo (down 22 per cent) and only 12 per cent of students take a games console with them to university (down 24 per cent).

However, 96 per cent of students own a laptop, while 90 per cent have a smartphone – up from 80 per cent last year.

In total, the average student takes possessions worth £2,266 with them to university, the survey says.

Almost one in four students says they own an iPad (up 147 per cent on last year), while the average student had £715 worth of digital music and over £200 of online journals and textbooks.

Sara Newell, manager of student markets at Endsleigh, said students were relying on just a few portable devices both for work and play.

“From listening to music, watching films and taking photos, to using these gadgets for reading text books digitally, or making lecture notes, these high-tech devices have become an everyday part of student life,” she said.

Ms Newell said it was important that students keep their possessions safe by checking the security of their accommodation, making sure doors and windows are locked and ensuring nothing valuable is on display through the window.

jack.grove@tsleducation.com

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