Grant winners

February 9, 2012

LEVERHULME TRUST

Research Project Grants

Basic sciences

• Award winner: David Tsiklauri

• Institution: Queen Mary, University of London

• Value: £157,750

Advanced model of solar radio bursts via plasma kinetic simulation

• Award winner: Duncan Mackay

• Institution: University of St Andrews

• Value: £116,863

Simulating large-scale solar magnetic fields: application to space weather

• Award winner: Christopher Watson

• Institution: Queen's University Belfast

• Value: £169,201

Towards detecting Earth-like alien worlds

• Award winner: Paul F. McMillan

• Institution: University College London

• Value: £164,159

Survival and adaptability of organisms at gigapascal pressures

Economics, business studies and industrial relations

• Award winner: Francesco Caselli

• Institution: London School of Economics

• Value: £30,092

Trade as a source of macroeconomic diversification

• Award winner: Orla Gough

• Institution: University of Westminster

• Value: £64,260

Locating poverty in retirement among women of the Asian diaspora in Britain

Social studies

• Award winner: Dariusz Wojcik

• Institution: University of Oxford

• Value: £75,431

The end of investment bank capitalism? Mapping the global securities industry

• Award winner: Jane Lewis

• Institution: London School of Economics

• Value: £84,911

Renegotiating parenthood: parents and children

ACTION MEDICAL RESEARCH

• Award winner: Robert Harvey

• Institution: UCL School of Pharmacy, University of London

• Value: £124,835

Genetic causes of startle disease

• Award winner: Topun Austin

• Institution: The Rosie Hospital, Cambridge

• Value: £131,150

Epilepsy in babies - improving seizure detection

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH

Public Health Research programme

• Award winner: Jennie Popay

• Institution: Lancaster University

• Value: £358,961

Evaluating the contribution of community engagement to the impact on health inequalities of the national regeneration initiative New Deal for Communities

HS & DR programme

• Award winner: Jill Maben

• Institution: King's College London

• Value: £374,124

Evaluating a major innovation in hospital design: workforce implications and impact on patient and staff experiences of all single-room hospital accommodation

IN DETAIL

Major Research Fellowship

• Award winner: Phillipp Schofield

• Institution: Aberystwyth University

• Value: £140,507

The Great Famine: Dearth and Society in Medieval England, c.1300

This project will be the first substantial investigation of the impact of the Great Famine in England in the early 14th century. The Great Famine was northern Europe's most extensive famine of the past millennium, but relatively little has been written about it. Employing a range of material - a good deal of it hitherto unexamined - this study will explore the famine as well as its demographic, social, economic and political context.

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