FutureLearn plans to stand out from Mooc crowd

UK platform aims to make up for late start via ‘social architecture’

September 19, 2013

The UK’s first massive open online course platform will focus on promoting student discussion and debate in an effort to stand out from the Mooc crowd, according to Simon Nelson, its chief executive.

FutureLearn will offer “something fresh, something different”, he told Times Higher Education, including being optimised for use on smartphones.

The platform, which is owned by The Open University and was launched on 18 September, will compete with the likes of US-based platforms Coursera and edX, the latter of which last week announced plans to develop its open source platform, Open edX, with Google.

FutureLearn – which initially will feature 20 courses from across its 23 university partners – would have a “very powerful social architecture” that will be familiar to users of social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter, said Mr Nelson.

Alongside now established Mooc elements such as video, slides, text, audio and multiple-choice quizzes, students will have their own profile pages and will be able to “follow” others studying on the platform.

FutureLearn will also trial “peer assessment” from next year so that students can publish their written work for others to review.

Although “very pleased” with the launch version, delivered after nine months of development, Mr Nelson said it was still “very much a beta”.

Accordingly, FutureLearn will continue to test and introduce new features, he added.

Neil Morris, director of digital learning at the University of Leeds, said his institution’s “mini-Mooc” in natural resources management – based on a campus undergraduate module – would be the first FutureLearn course to finish and would report on how the platform performed.

The platform might receive initial criticism over its limitations, but this would be unjustified, he said. “I think FutureLearn will quickly match the functionality of existing Mooc platforms…it’s only fair that it has some development time,” he added.

Tens of thousands of people from 165 countries have pre-registered interest in the courses, Mr Nelson said.

As well as a desire to introduce new students from home and abroad to their paid courses, universities’ interest in Moocs has also been driven by public service and the need to position themselves in an “emerging digital landscape”, he added.

Courses were unveiled on the same day the government published The Maturing of the Mooc, a literature review highlighting debate over the courses’ significance, educational value and potential business models.

David Willetts, the universities and science minister, said he viewed FutureLearn’s launch as a “significant moment”.

He added that he had been “frustrated” that it had launched well after the other major platforms, but pointed to its “serious education analytics…so time has not been wasted”.

Mr Willetts said it remained to be seen whether a single platform would come to dominate the market.

“I think there’s still a strong chance for a good educational offering with good analytics and internationally recognised education institutions…to have an impact,” the minister added.


You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments

Reader's comments (1)

I signed up for a course at FutureLearn. The class, not set to start for several months, did not have the texts, syllabus or anything else listed. I e-mailed the person who is teaching the class at his university e-mail, and he said the materials would be there at the time. It is now a month ot the class; I got a reminder about it by e-mail. However, there is still no syllabus or other information on the class. That renders a class worthless. If one doesn't know what the texts are until the class begins, one can't obtaini them for three weeks, and I am perpetually behind in these classes as a result. I wrote to the only contact information for Futurelearn given on its web site, a feedback e-mail address, adn got back an auto mail that we don't answer all of them - in other words noone even reads them and certainly noone responds or takes action to fix a problem that needs immediately to be solved, such as no books listed for a class soon to start. I looked for who the executive officers are to write them, and the "team" doesn't consist of any humans, just companies such as Skype. Maybe I'd do better to write to Skype and the rest of the "team" and tell them to stop funding this scam outfit. Yours, Dora

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Most Commented

University of Oxford students walking on campus

University of Oxford snatches top spot from Caltech in this year’s World University Rankings as Asia’s rise continues

Home secretary says government will support 'best' universities

Man handing microphone to audience member

Academic attainment of disadvantaged students can be improved if they can decide how they are assessed, study claims

Italy's gold medallist

New measures to ensure universities are ‘not penalised’ for taking poorer students also outlined for next stage of TEF

Brexit from the EU

The historic UK referendum result is a challenge to the core beliefs of those attending this year’s EAIE annual conference, says Jack Grove