BBSRC unveils £125 million for doctoral training

A research council has announced £125 million of funding for doctoral training partnerships in the biosciences.

October 3, 2014

The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council is funding 12 partnerships that will train 1,250 PhD students over five years.

Business secretary Vince Cable said the funding would “safeguard” Britain’s reputation as a world leader in the life sciences.

Awards of between £4 million and £15 million have been made to the groups, which include more than 30 universities in total, as well as research institutes and trusts. The partnerships will train the next generation of scientists that can help tackle major challenges in agriculture, food, industrial biotechnology, bioenergy and health.

Announcing the funding at the Roslin Institute at the University of Edinburgh, Mr Cable was expected to say: “The UK punches far beyond its weight in science and innovation globally, which is a credit to our talented scientists and first-class universities. This new funding will safeguard Britain’s status as a world leader in life sciences and agricultural technology.”

The 12 lead institutions in the partnerships are Imperial College London, the John Innes Centre, Newcastle University, University College London and the universities of Bristol, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Leeds, Manchester, Nottingham, Oxford and Warwick.

Around 30 per cent of the students will get training in agriculture and food security, 20 per cent in industrial biotechnology and bioenergy, 10 per cent in bioscience for health and the remaining 40 per cent in other areas.

Executive director of innovation and skills at the BBSRC, Celia Caulcott, said that the research council was “paving the way for an explosion in new economic sectors and bioscience that will change the way we live our lives in the 21st century”.

“To achieve this we need to maintain our leading position in global bioscience by ensuring that the next generation of scientists have the best training and skills. The next generation of bioscientists are our future and we must invest in them now,” she added.

holly.else@tesglobal.com

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

International Student Support Assistant YORK ST JOHN UNIVERSITY
Senior Lecturer: Architecture (Cultural Content) NORWICH UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS
Head of Department of Physics ZHEJIANG UNIVERSITY
Research Assistant LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS & POLITICAL SCIENCE LSE

Most Commented

question marks PhD study

Selecting the right doctorate is crucial for success. Robert MacIntosh and Kevin O'Gorman share top 10 tips on how to pick a PhD

India, UK, flag

Sir Keith Burnett reflects on what he learned about international students while in India with the UK prime minister

Pencil lying on open diary

Requesting a log of daily activity means that trust between the institution and the scholar has broken down, says Toby Miller

Application for graduate job
Universities producing the most employable graduates have been ranked by companies around the world in the Global University Employability Ranking 2016
Construction workers erecting barriers

Directly linking non-EU recruitment to award levels in teaching assessment has also been under consideration, sources suggest