Local knowledge

September 22, 2016

As a long-term resident of Liverpool and a staff member of the university, I wouldn’t say that the citizens of Liverpool voted to stay in the European Union because of their fear of losing international students (“Brexit cloud looms over sunny Liverpool”, 15 September). That feels like a fumbling stretch that neglects to acknowledge the hundreds of millions of pounds that the EU directly contributed to the development of the city’s economy and infrastructure. EU money transformed Liverpool into a place where people actually want to live, work and study. The locals know this, even if they’ve never clapped eyes on a Chinese student from Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University in their lives.

rmul_247714
Via timeshighereducation.com


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