Odds and quads

Ceramic cabbages, knitted cauliflowers and caterpillars, birds made of stone and metal, dancing daffodils, even a hive of porcelain bees: all formed part of the allotment created by the Manchester School of Art for the Royal Horticultural Society Flower Show at Tatton Park in Cheshire last month.

August 15, 2013

When the school, which forms part of Manchester Metropolitan University, was invited to create a piece, the many keen gardeners among its staff soon hit on the idea of an allotment. They then went on, in the words of principal lecturer Jane McFadyen, to “use beds and sheds in the way we would normally use plinths, frames and showcases”. Everything was made rather than grown.

Manchester Met fashion students also got the chance to showcase their work on Tatton Ladies’ Day.

The university hopes that the work created for the allotment will be put on display at other gardening shows and events on ecological themes.

Send suggestions for this series on the treasures, oddities and curiosities owned by universities across the world to matthew.reisz@tsleducation.com

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