Today's news

August 12, 2003

Whips fear top-up fees rebellion
Government whips and universities will wage a war of attrition over the summer to prevent a backbench rebellion over top-up fees when Parliament reconvenes. Supporters of the measure, which would cost students £3,000 a year, see it as the only realistic way of paying for the expansion of higher education.
(The Times)

Quick-hits approach damages healthcare research
Research that could bring long-term benefits to the nation’s health is being ignored in favour of politically attractive “quick hits”, according to a report by the Health Development Agency, which is responsible for promoting healthier lifestyles.
(The Guardian)

Graduates forced to return to nest
Two-thirds of students go home to live with their parents after graduating, compared with just half this time last year.  Personal finance experts put the jump down to rising debts and the pressing need many students feel to begin repayments on loans taken out during their degree years.
(Financial Times, The Times, The Independent, Daily Express)

Bradford races up league table
Bradford College has stunned educationists by leaping 53 places – out of a possible 73 – in the national league table for teacher training colleges.
(The Times)

Warwick queries late applications plan
Warwick University has questioned proposals to delay student applications until after A-level results are published. Such a reform could mean delaying the start of the academic year until January for first-year students.
(Birmingham Post)

Harper Adams becomes centre of excellence
Harper Adams University College is to become a centre for innovation by providing knowledge and expertise to businesses in a bid to boost Shropshire’s economy. The Centre for Rural Innovation will be launched in September.
(Birmingham Post)

Fame academics
A few star professors in the US are commanding massive perks and salaries as universities bid for their services.
(The Guardian)   

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