QAA logo available to universities as quality mark

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education has launched a quality mark to assure students about standards in higher education.

August 1, 2012

Universities and colleges that subscribe to the higher education regulator will be able to display the QAA logo if they achieve positive outcomes in their institutional-level reviews.

For past audits, this means that they have been awarded a “confidence” judgement in all the areas assessed by the QAA, or that they have taken the necessary action after receiving a “limited confidence” judgement.

The scheme – similar to the “Kitemark” system used to indicate the safety of consumer products – is designed to act as an official seal of approval from the QAA, which oversees quality and standards in the sector.

The quality mark comprises the QAA logo together with the year in which the institution was last reviewed. Until now, the QAA has limited the use of its logo, which is a registered trademark.

In their White Paper last year, government ministers called for more use of such quality marks in higher education to help inform students about the quality of courses and institutions.

Anthony McClaran, chief executive of the QAA, said the move would improve public understanding of standards and quality in higher education.

“As an independent and trusted agency, we believe that the QAA’s quality mark will reassure prospective students at home and overseas that the academic standards and quality of the institution to which they are applying meet nationally agreed expectations,” he said.

John Vinney, vice-chancellor of Bournemouth University, said he was keen to use the new quality mark.

“It is an easily recognisable international badge of excellence that will give instant reassurance to students and the public that Bournemouth University offers a high-quality learning environment and a great student experience,” he said.

“We will be wearing our badge with pride.”

Peter Fidler, vice-chancellor of the University of Sunderland, added: “We very much welcome the introduction of the new quality mark, which makes the QAA’s role in the assurance of quality and standards more transparent and visible to the public as well as to the sector.

“In an increasingly diverse market, we believe this mark acts as a standard of quality for established providers and supports the recognition of the UK’s higher education brand at home and overseas.”

jack.grove@tsleducation.com

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Most Commented

Daniel Mitchell illustration (29 June 2017)

Academics who think they can do the work of professional staff better than professional staff themselves are not showing the kind of respect they expect from others

celebrate, cheer, tef results

Emilie Murphy calls on those who challenged the teaching excellence framework methodology in the past to stop sharing their university ratings with pride

A podium constructed out of wood

There are good reasons why some big names are missing from our roster

Senior academics at Teesside University put at risk of redundancy as summer break gets under way

Thorns and butterflies

Conditions that undermine the notion of scholarly vocation – relentless work, ubiquitous bureaucracy – can cause academics acute distress and spur them to quit, says Ruth Barcan