Leru opens up to Eastern Europe

Joint initiative aims to tackle problems in European research environment

October 8, 2016

A group of seven universities in central and eastern Europe will work with the League of European Research Universities to help develop science in the region.

The initiative is designed to help give research universities in eastern and central Europe a voice during Leru’s interactions with the European Commission.

The group wants to show policy makers that there is “more that unites research universities than divides them”, according to Bert van der Zwaan, ad interim chair of Leru.

Institutions in the new group, which will be known as the CE7, are the universities of Belgrade, Ljubljana, Tartu, Warsaw and Zagreb, Charles University in Prague and Eötvös Loránd University. Rectors from these institutions met with the heads of the universities of Freiburg, Helsinki, Leuven and Zurich, and Utrecht University in Prague - all Leru members - this weekend.

Among the topics discussed by the 12 university chiefs were the low success rates of European research funding programmes, student mobility and student skills development.

Professor van der Zwaan, who is also the rector magnificus of Utrecht University, said: “I am very pleased that we can now announce a joint initiative to demonstrate to policy makers across Europe that there is more that unites research universities than divides them.”

Leru said that it will bring input from the CE7 to its meetings with the EU Commission about the European Research Area and Open Science Policy Platform, which advises the EC on open science policy.

The group will also specifically look at actions of the EC that target research in Central and Eastern Europe, which they say do not function as well as they could. Part of their discussions will look at different approaches to research in this part of Europe that could work in the funding programme that follows Horizon 2020.

Kurt Deketelaere, Leru secretary general, said: “Together, we will take on a number of thorny issues, reflect on them, and show policy makers that win-win solutions are possible.”

In addition the universities in the group hope to work together to develop joint PhDs and conferences, and collaborative research projects, as well as look at student exchanges, staff mobility and evaluation systems.

holly.else@tesglobal.com

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Most Commented

Worried man wiping forehead
Two academics explain how to beat some of the typical anxieties associated with a doctoral degree

Felipe Fernández-Armesto takes issue with a claim that the EU has been playing the sovereignty card in Brexit negotiations

Brexit jigsaw

UCU attacks plans to cut 171 posts, but university denies Brexit 'the reason'

Kenny Dalglish

Agnes Bäker and Amanda Goodall have found that academics who are happiest at work have a head of department who is a distinguished researcher. How can such people be encouraged into management?

A group of flamingos and a Marabou stork

A right-wing philosopher in Texas tells John Gill how a minority of students can shut down debates and intimidate lecturers – and why he backs Trump