Journals' ends: scholars favour prestige over access

When deciding where to publish their research, less than one in three academics see it as very important that a journal makes its articles available for free on the internet, a survey has found

June 6, 2013

Meanwhile, more than 80 per cent of about 3,500 scholars polled by the UK Survey of Academics 2012 say it is very important that the journal they favour has a high impact factor, publishes in a field close to their research and is widely circulated among their peers.

Fewer respondents say that journal selectivity is very important and less than a third of them emphasise the journal’s accessibility to readers in developing nations.

Perhaps ironically, the survey, published on 14 May, also shows the importance of online and open access to academics.

It found that 49 per cent of respondents say they would often like to use journal articles that are not held in their library collections. Where they cannot find the materials they need, 90 per cent say they often or occasionally look online for freely available versions.

Source: UK Survey of Academics 2012 by research and consulting service Ithaka S+R, Jisc and Research Libraries UK
Note: ‘Very important’ corresponds to a mark of 8, 9 or 10 on a 1-10 scale of importance

elizabeth.gibney@tsleducation.com

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Reader's comments (2)

For those interested in the full report, it is available (in PDF) at: http://repository.jisc.ac.uk/5209/1/UK_Survey_of_Academics_2012_FINAL.pdf David Prosser RLUK
The finding from the survey confirms findings from earlier surveys. But unfortunately the THE headline is misleading by leaving the false impression that authors face a trade-off between prestige and open access. I elaborate here. https://plus.google.com/109377556796183035206/posts/Bq34RGD7ao5

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Register to continue  

You've enjoyed reading five THE articles this month. Register now to get five more, or subscribe for unrestricted access.

Most Commented

Globalisation

Times Higher Education World University Rankings data reveal the top 200 most outward-looking institutions

Common cactus finch (Geospiza scandens)

Tiffany Taylor on a thought-provoking view of the forces acting to ensure survival

Student asking question during class

University of Reading research finds link between undergraduate satisfaction and ethnicity of lecturers

Level of quality compass

Authors argue this means universities should spend less on senior academics and give promising younger scholars more of a chance

Stressed businessman answering four telephones

Some surveys show faculty putting in at least 60 hours a week, but research casts doubt on whether this is a productive routine