How countries tie institutions’ cash to national goals

With fee rises in the offing for UK universities with ‘high-quality’ teaching, we look at a EUA study of performance-linked funding across Europe

July 16, 2015
How countries tie institutions’ cash to national goals (small)
Source: iStock

Click to view a high-resolution version


Universities in England ‘offering high-quality teaching’ will be able to raise tuition fees in line with inflation from 2017-18, according to last week’s Budget. Jack Grove examines a recent European University Association report on performance-related funding to see how other European countries use funding to incentivise good teaching and other goals.

POSTSCRIPT:

Print headline: Cash for excellence

Please login or register to read this article.

Register to continue

Get a month's unlimited access to THE content online. Just register and complete your career summary.

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most commented

Summer is upon northern hemisphere academics. But its cherished traditional identity as a time for intensive research is being challenged by the increasing obligations around teaching and administration that often crowd out research entirely during term time. So is the 40/40/20 workload model still sustainable? Respondents to a THE survey suggest not. Nick Mayo hears why

25 July

Sponsored