Grant winners - 6 November 2014

November 6, 2014

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Epidemiology and evolution of zoonotic schistosomiasis in a changing world


Identification of the molecular substrate for L-lactate-mediated catecholamine signalling in the brain


Basal ganglia signalling mechanisms and ageing

 

National Institute for Health Research

Health Technology Assessment Programme

Seasonal influenza vaccination effectiveness II (SIVE II): use of a large national primary care and laboratory-linked dataset to evaluate live attenuated and trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination effectiveness


Synthesising a clinical prognostic rule for ankle injuries in the emergency department (SPRAINED)


  • Award winner: Ruth Langley
  • Institution: University College London
  • Value: £3,124,812

Add-Aspirin trial: a phase III double-blind placebo-controlled randomised trial assessing the addition of aspirin after standard primary therapy in early stage common solid tumours

 

Royal Society

Wolfson Research Merit Awards

Awards are worth £10,000-£30,000 a year, which is a salary enhancement

Silicon photonics for the 21st century


Disorder-free semiconducting materials platform

 

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

First grant – revised 2009

Automatic semantic analysis of 3D content in digital repositories


Standard research

  • Award winner: Chris Speed
  • Institution: Edinburgh College of Art
  • Value: £306,871

Connected high street

In detail

Award winner: Emanuele Trucco
Institution: University of Dundee
Value: £922,996 (EPSRC contribution)

Multimodal retinal biomarkers for vascular dementia: developing enabling image analysis tools

Evidence already suggests that changes to the tree-shaped patterns of blood vessels in the eye can be linked to a number of diseases, such as stroke and cardiovascular disease. Emanuele Trucco, professor of computational vision, and his team - in collaboration with academics from the University of Edinburgh - will use specially developed computer software – which analyses high-definition images of the eye from multiple instruments – to establish whether such changes can act as an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease. “There is the promise of early warning in a non-invasive way,” said Professor Trucco. “And we even might be able to use the test to differentiate between different types of dementia.”

Times Higher Education free 30-day trial

Please login or register to read this article.

Register to continue

Get a month's unlimited access to THE content online. Just register and complete your career summary.

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most commented

Summer is upon northern hemisphere academics. But its cherished traditional identity as a time for intensive research is being challenged by the increasing obligations around teaching and administration that often crowd out research entirely during term time. So is the 40/40/20 workload model still sustainable? Respondents to a THE survey suggest not. Nick Mayo hears why

25 July

Sponsored