Grant winners - 6 November 2014

November 6, 2014

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Epidemiology and evolution of zoonotic schistosomiasis in a changing world


Identification of the molecular substrate for L-lactate-mediated catecholamine signalling in the brain


Basal ganglia signalling mechanisms and ageing

 

National Institute for Health Research

Health Technology Assessment Programme

Seasonal influenza vaccination effectiveness II (SIVE II): use of a large national primary care and laboratory-linked dataset to evaluate live attenuated and trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination effectiveness


Synthesising a clinical prognostic rule for ankle injuries in the emergency department (SPRAINED)


Add-Aspirin trial: a phase III double-blind placebo-controlled randomised trial assessing the addition of aspirin after standard primary therapy in early stage common solid tumours

 

Royal Society

Wolfson Research Merit Awards

Awards are worth £10,000-£30,000 a year, which is a salary enhancement

Silicon photonics for the 21st century


Disorder-free semiconducting materials platform

 

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

First grant – revised 2009

Automatic semantic analysis of 3D content in digital repositories


Standard research

  • Award winner: Chris Speed
  • Institution: Edinburgh College of Art
  • Value: £306,871

Connected high street

In detail

Emanuele Trucco, <a href=University of Dundee" src="/Pictures/web/r/q/w/emanuele-trucco-university-of-dunde_150.jpg" />

Award winner: Emanuele Trucco
Institution: University of Dundee
Value: £922,996 (EPSRC contribution)

Multimodal retinal biomarkers for vascular dementia: developing enabling image analysis tools

Evidence already suggests that changes to the tree-shaped patterns of blood vessels in the eye can be linked to a number of diseases, such as stroke and cardiovascular disease. Emanuele Trucco, professor of computational vision, and his team - in collaboration with academics from the University of Edinburgh - will use specially developed computer software – which analyses high-definition images of the eye from multiple instruments – to establish whether such changes can act as an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease. “There is the promise of early warning in a non-invasive way,” said Professor Trucco. “And we even might be able to use the test to differentiate between different types of dementia.”

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