General election 2015: 8 key Twitter moments for HE

Defining moments for universities on the night that the UK went to the polls

May 8, 2015

David Cameron’s Conservative Party will form a majority government after gaining 331 of the 650 parliamentary seats at the 2015 general election.

The result could have huge implications for higher education, and has already left its mark on a number of prominent figures from the sector. Here are 8 such examples.


1. When pollster and professor of politics at the University of Strathclyde, John Curtice, predicted that the Conservatives and the Scottish National Party would be celebrating when the results were announced, former Liberal Democrat leader Paddy Ashdown declared he would eat his hat if the academic’s exit poll proved accurate. When offered a hat to eat just a few hours later, he did what any Lib Dem would do, and changed his mind.

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