From today's UK papers

January 9, 2002

£1m can buy you happiness
A ten year study has confirmed what the underpaid and overworked majority always feared: money can buy you happiness. The only problem is the £1 million price tag. Economists at the University of Warwick believe they have found proof that filthy lucre can bring contentment when supplied in sufficient quantities. (Independent, Guardian, Daily Telegraph, Times)

BT pulls plug on 1901 census website
The online version of the 1901 census has been pulled from the internet after British Telecom warned that the system could not cope with the enormous demand for access. (Guardian)

New Apple computer aims to be leading light
The first computer that appears to be modelled on an anglepoise lamp was unveiled yesterday as Apple continued its mission to transform home computers from nondescript beige boxes into objets d'art . (Daily Telegraph)

Birmingham first to cluster its schools
State secondary schools will be run along the lines of the Oxbridge university model under a scheme being launched by the country's largest urban education authority. Birmingham is to become the first home for revolutionary "cluster" arrangements of secondary schools, which will soon be introduced nationally by the government. (Independent)

A bad way to produce good heads
Management jargon and bureaucracy will stifle the new training college for headteachers, according to Chris Woodhead, former Ofsted chief. (Daily Telegraph)

Watchdog casts doubts on earnings data
Further doubt has been cast on the government's earnings numbers as the Statistics Commission said that promised data improvements had not been made. Sir John Kingman, chairman of the Commission, has written to Len Cook, the national statistician, to complain that important recommendations from a review of the average earnings index in 1999 had not been implemented. (Financial Times)

Ireland heads world index of globalisation
Ireland is by far the world's most globalised country, according to a study of 62 countries to be published in the US today. The Globalisation Index puts Ireland well ahead of countries seen as having open economies, such as Singapore, in third palce, and New Zealand, in 19th. (Financial Times)

Social workers set codes of conduct
Incompetent social workers could be "struck off" if they fail to meet standards set by the profession's first codes of conduct, according to a new regulatory body. Draft guidelines outlined yesterday by the General Social Care Council, will create a national register of England's 1.2 million social workers and care professionals. (Times)

A tribute to life and longevity
A silk banner, uncovered in a house in Kent, tells the story of a couple's fight to create Hong Kong University. Alexandra Blair, a descendant, reports. (Times)

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