From today's UK papers

December 7, 2000

FINANCIAL TIMES

Supersonic aircraft could fly faster and farther at less cost with the simple addition of small flaps to jet engine inlet ducts, say researchers at the University of Illinois.

A frog-like robot, under development at Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology, that can roll and hop around, may soon be riding asteroids and searching for water on other planets.

A look at Systemonic, a wireless chip company and a pioneering spin-off from the Technical University of Dresden, Germany.

THE GUARDIAN

A primitive robot has been brought back to life at the University of the West of England to inspire a new generation.

DAILY MAIL

Mad cow disease could have come from outer space, according to Chandra Wickramasinghe and Sir Fred Hoyle.

DAILY TELEGRAPH

Scientists at Imperial College, London have found a way to turn embryo cells into bone cells, which could lead to new approaches to repairing broken limbs.

The most thorough genetic study of its kind, from the University of Uppsala in Sweden, has traced the human family tree to an "Eve", who lived in Africa more than 50,000 years ago.

THE TIMES

The one-off "milk round" for recruiting graduates has become a thing of the past because recruitment is done all year round. It is not possible to do it all in one step and a more flexible approach is needed.

Two US scientists have suggested that schizophrenia is caused by an infection caught from cats.

Graduates could end up owing more than £20,000 when they leave university.

MISCELLANY

The laboratory that created Dolly the cloned sheep has announced plans to mass produce cancer drugs in the eggs of cloned genetically modified chickens ( Guardian , Independent , Daily Mail , Daily Telegraph , Times ).

The antiquated LD50 toxicity test, in which half the number of laboratory rats used for a sample are killed, has been abolished ( Independent , Daily Telegraph ).

A British spacecraft will land on Mars on Boxing Day 2003 to conduct tests that could prove whether there has been life on the Red Planet, scientists have confirmed ( Daily Telegraph , Times ).

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