EPSRC chief wants words of advice from critical voices

But extant strategic decisions will not be revisited, Paul Golby says

October 31, 2013

Source: Rex Features

Transparent: Paul Golby promises more openness in the making of appointments and decisions affecting strategy

Critics of controversial decisions made by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council should join one of its advisory groups, according to the body’s chair, Paul Golby.

Dr Golby was speaking in relation to the publication on 29 October of the EPSRC’s response to an independent review of the way it receives advice.

The review was one of two that Dr Golby commissioned last December in response to widespread concerns that the body had not consulted widely enough before making controversial decisions.

The review, led by Suzanne Fortier, former president of Canada’s Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, reported in July and set out a series of recommendations relating to transparency and inclusiveness.

The EPSRC’s governing council has now set out how it will implement the recommendations.

It has pledged to publish terms of reference for the research council’s strategic advisory teams and networks, including specifying the process for identifying and appointing their academic members.

Appointments to the advisory bodies, which will no longer be chaired by members of the EPSRC executive, will be overseen by a sub-committee of the EPSRC council.

Notes and theories

Dr Golby, who is the former UK chairman and chief executive of the energy firm E.ON, said the EPSRC would also publish “full and appropriate” minutes from advisory group meetings so that “the community can see the nature of the advice we are receiving, and…whether we have accepted or rejected that advice, and the reasons why”.

However, the council will stop short of publishing minutes of advisory group meetings because their members indicated that such a move would inhibit their willingness to speak frankly, he added.

The decisions by the EPSRC that have angered critics include demand management, the abolition of project studentships and the “shaping capability agenda”, which links choices about funding for specific areas to their national importance as well as their existing excellence and capacity.

Dr Golby hoped that the EPSRC’s critics would be satisfied when they saw it “doing exactly what we are saying we will do”, but he insisted that major strategic decisions would not be revisited.

“We are not about to throw all the cards up in the air and repeat what caused all the problems in the first place,” he said.

But he emphasised that EPSRC policy was always evolving alongside the UK’s scientific and funding environments. He saw “no reason” why critics would not be recruited if they put themselves forward to the advisory bodies, where they could “have their say” on future developments.

“Having a diversity of view is a good thing. The last thing I want is a group of people who agree with everything: that is not how you get results,” Dr Golby said.

The other independent review he commissioned, on peer review, will be delivered and published in December, he added.

paul.jump@tsleducation.com

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

question marks PhD study

Selecting the right doctorate is crucial for success. Robert MacIntosh and Kevin O'Gorman share top 10 tips on how to pick a PhD

India, UK, flag

Sir Keith Burnett reflects on what he learned about international students while in India with the UK prime minister

Pencil lying on open diary

Requesting a log of daily activity means that trust between the institution and the scholar has broken down, says Toby Miller

Application for graduate job
Universities producing the most employable graduates have been ranked by companies around the world in the Global University Employability Ranking 2016
Construction workers erecting barriers

Directly linking non-EU recruitment to award levels in teaching assessment has also been under consideration, sources suggest