Daily TV & radio guide - Thursday

December 14, 2000

Routes of English (9.00 am R4). London Jamaican. Melvyn Bragg consults Linton Kwesi Johnson and people on the streets of Brixton. » Routes of English
Crossing Continents (11.00 am R4). Swedes under stress. » crossing continents
The Most Beautiful Sound in the World (11.30 am R4). Repeat of Piers Plowright's aural exploration.
EUtopia (11.30 am, also 1.30, 3.30, 5.30, 7.30 BBC Knowledge). "Loads of Euros" - the impact of EU grants on remote communities such as a Greek mountain village and a nomadic tribe in Sweden. An episode of the co-produced series that hasn't been previously shown on BBC2.
Word of Mouth (4.00 R4). Michael Rosen begins a new series with items about the language of film and of today's teenagers.
The Material World (4.30 R4). Supercritical fluids - an alternative to chemical solvents. This week's experts are Ray Marriott and Martyn Poliakoff.
Copyrights and Wrongs (8.00 R4). Intellectual property then and now, probed by Peter Day. (first of two programmes.)
Analysis (8.30 R4). Ian Hargreaves on the decline in participatory politics - or is it just taking new forms?
The Windsors (8.00 C4). That family again.
Horizon (9.00 BBC2). Revised repeat of "Atlantis Reborn", the documentary that convincingly demolished Graham Hancock's ideas about a lost continent of Atlantis, and about which Hancock complained to the Broadcasting Standards Commission. (Although he has a Channel 4 series to his name, was Hancock worth so much bother? Did someone mention the words "sledgehammer" and "nut"? The brief summary of the BSC adjudication isn't very informative: if you want to know more detail, e-mail me  and I'll send you a longer version.) » Horizon
The Science of Crime (9.00 C4). Forensic science with Kathy Reichs, psychologist and detective story writer. » EQUINOX
Leading Edge Live (9.00 R4). A panel of scientists face questioning from the general public.
Night Waves (9.30 R3). The State and the Arts, a discussion featuring Mary Warnock, the Tate Modern's Andrew Brighton, and arts minister Alan Howarth (who was also in Saturday's BBC2 cultural-restitution programme. Busy guy.)
Open Science (from 12.30 am BBC2). The Open University's offerings for the night begin with Does Science Matter? and include Making Contact (2.00 am), on the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. » Open2.NET

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

James Fryer illustration (27 July 2017)

It is not Luddism to be cautious about destroying an academic publishing industry that has served us well, says Marilyn Deegan

Jeffrey Beall, associate professor and librarian at the University of Colorado Denver

Creator of controversial predatory journals blacklist says some peers are failing to warn of dangers of disreputable publishers

Hand squeezing stress ball
Working 55 hours per week, the loss of research periods, slashed pensions, increased bureaucracy, tiny budgets and declining standards have finally forced Michael Edwards out
Kayaker and jet skiiers

Nazima Kadir’s social circle reveals a range of alternative careers for would-be scholars, and often with better rewards than academia

hole in ground

‘Drastic action’ required to fix multibillion-pound shortfall in Universities Superannuation Scheme, expert warns