THE podcast: England's first Coursera Moocs

November 20, 2013

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How much does it cost to develop a Mooc? How many staff hours does it take to deliver it? The University of London International Programmes was the first English institution to offer massive open online courses on Coursera, the US platform with more than 5 million registered users. In this podcast, some of those involved in that process discuss their experiences.

UoLIP director of academic development Mike Kerrison, academic project manager Barney Grainger and associate director of the undergraduate laws programme Patricia McKellar talk to Times Higher Education reporter Chris Parr.

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