Very rich tones

January 30, 2014

Re: Patricia Smyth’s letter “High and arbitrary fees” (23 January) about the British Museum’s practice of charging steep fees for the use of images it holds.

We have experienced this in relation to the Victoria & Albert Museum. Our research involves making films with people who live with dementia, for which we use still images. The project is purely educational in purpose, aiming to find out if this process benefits participants and helps to improve the quality of care for those living with dementia.

One participant – a man in his mid-eighties living in residential care – was reminded of a positive time in his life when he saw a painting of a place where he had lived as a boy. The artist who created the work died more than 50 years ago. The V&A now holds the rights, and it wanted to charge us a usage fee of £50 (later “reduced” to £40 when we reiterated the nature of our project). It is not possible for us to pay such fees for images on our modest budget. How frustrating that the V&A was determined not to support our work.

Katherine Ludwin, research assistant
Andrea Capstick, lecturer in dementia studies
University of Bradford

Times Higher Education free 30-day trial

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

United Nations peace keeper

Understanding the unwritten rules of graduate study is vital if you want to get the most from your PhD supervision, say Kevin O'Gorman and Robert MacIntosh

David Parkins Christmas illustration (22 December 2016)

A Dickensian tale, set in today’s university

Eleanor Shakespeare illustration (5 January 2017)

Fixing problems in the academic job market by reducing the number of PhDs would homogenise the sector, argues Tom Cutterham

Houses of Parliament, Westminster, government

There really is no need for the Higher Education and Research Bill, says Anne Sheppard

poi, circus

Kate Riegle van West had to battle to bring her circus life and her academic life together